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Age of a person Options
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 4:35:07 PM

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Which sentences are OK and which ones are wrong?

1 He is a young-aged guy. 2 He is a guy of young age. 3 He is a guy of a young age.

4 He is a middle-aged guy. 5 He is a guy of middle age. 6 He is a guy of a middle age.

7 He is an old-aged guy. 8 He is a guy of old age. 9 He is a guy of an old age.
thar
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 5:20:51 PM

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Ivan Fadeev wrote:
Which sentences are OK and which ones are wrong?

1 He is a young-aged guy. 2 He is a guy of young age. 3 He is a guy of a young age.
None. He is young. He is a young guy. The adjective says it all.

4 He is a middle-aged guy. 5 He is a guy of middle age. 6 He is a guy of a middle age.
He is middle-aged. He is a middle aged man. (the article refers to 'a man'). You wouldn't say 6

7 He is an old-aged guy. 8 He is a guy of old age. 9 He is a guy of an old age.
He is old/elderly/aged [two syllable adjective ei-jid]. He is an old/elderly man.
Like 'young', the adjective suffices. You wouldn't say 9



Young and old are simple - you just use the adjective. The problem comes in the middle, so you invent a compound adjective - middle-aged.
There is no need for that at either extreme, because you already have the adjectives.

You wouldn't say 'of - age' to describe a person.
That only works when you are talking about something pertaining to those years, and it only works for two of the three.
There, the nouns would include infancy, childhood, youth, middle age and old age.

eg
Belief in your invincibility is a characteristic of youth.
Disliking popular music is a symptom of middle age.
Rheumatism is usually a disease of old age.

But those refer to the stage of life, not to the person.

Think of it this way:
You have a tall man and a short man.
For the middle, you have to construct an adjective - you might call him a mid-sized man.
But not a man of tall height, or short height. The adjective takes care of that.

Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 5:43:27 PM

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Joined: 2/21/2015
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I suppose, subconsciously I was trying to answer the question.

What's his age?

So, my options are not felicitous. Would it be OK to say "He is in his twenties, thirties so on"

PS: Your options have been taken. No worries.)
thar
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 6:10:00 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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'age' is not normally a thing you are said to possess or be.

It would sound a bit odd to ask what age someone is. You would ask how old they are.

How old is he?
He is young/middle-aged/old
He is a baby/a toddler/ a child/a teenager
He is in his twenties/thirties.......nineties
He is over a hundred

I know there are languages where you ask that question with the noun, but in English it is asked with the adjective. How? not What?
How old? / how tall?

Except for weight, then it would normally be the verb
How much do they weigh?
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