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Koh Elaine
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 6:35:09 AM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
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The man had invited the girl and other mutual friends to his house in Pasir Ris as his parents were not home.

Shouldn't it be "not at home" instead?

Thanks.
renee talley 1
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 8:47:29 AM
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Joined: 8/1/2018
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Think Anxious Brick wall Should not doesn't qualified as a logical combination to be correct nor acceptable in any form of English grammar.

At this present moment the man acknowledged to the girl and her friends picked the wrong time. This gentleman acknowledged that his parents in Paris, France were not home . They were advised to create a specific time for a specific visit. This considered his offer a perfect solution to respect 2 make arrangements for his parents and their friends to make a visit that considerable advance notice everyone would agreed upon. Whistle Dancing Applause Anxious Applause

Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 9:00:56 AM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
I'm not home. He's not home. They're not home.
Very common expressions.


Will you be home this evening? I may stop later.

I need to go home now. Bye!

You need to go home -- I hear your mother calling you! (Old trick, used frequently when young.)


leonAzul
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 9:14:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Koh Elaine wrote:
The man had invited the girl and other mutual friends to his house in Pasir Ris as his parents were not home.

Shouldn't it be "not at home" instead?



As it is makes better sense. As I understand it, the man would have liked to have had his parents meet his friends, but his parents were not home, so he invited them to his own house.

The phrase "at home" would suggest that the man shared the same residence with his parents in this context.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 9:56:37 AM

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Joined: 10/12/2011
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Location: Annapolis, Maryland, United States
Koh Elaine wrote:
The man had invited the girl and other mutual friends to his house in Pasir Ris as his parents were not home.

Shouldn't it be "not at home" instead?

Thanks.


"Not home", as Wilmar said, is a perfectly normal, commonly used expression which indicates that the parents are not physically present.

In some circumstances, particularly in literature depicting behavior of the upper-middle or upper classes, the specific expression "not at home" may be used to indicate that, while a person may actually be present in their home, that person is not receiving visitors. Conversely, on certain occasions, when visitors are encouraged or when visitors might be expected to offer congratulations in person, an announcement that Mr. and Mrs. X will be "at home" from 4pm to 7pm would be a specific invitation.
NKM
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 2:04:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
leonAzul wrote:
Koh Elaine wrote:
The man had invited the girl and other mutual friends to his house in Pasir Ris as his parents were not home.

Shouldn't it be "not at home" instead?



As it is makes better sense. As I understand it, the man would have liked to have had his parents meet his friends, but his parents were not home, so he invited them to his own house.

The phrase "at home" would suggest that the man shared the same residence with his parents in this context.

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I agree that "not home" is perfectly natural (without the "at") for this use.

I also agree with the inference that "his house" refers to the house where he lives with his parents.

I submit, however, that the man did not necessarily want his parents to meet his friends. Rather, I suspect he was taking advantage of his parents' absence, enjoying the opportunity to participate in some clandestine or "unauthorized" activities with his friends.

The ancient adage is: "While the cat's away, the mice will play."

RuthP
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 5:00:56 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,150
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Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
NKM wrote:
leonAzul wrote:
Koh Elaine wrote:
The man had invited the girl and other mutual friends to his house in Pasir Ris as his parents were not home.

Shouldn't it be "not at home" instead?



As it is makes better sense. As I understand it, the man would have liked to have had his parents meet his friends, but his parents were not home, so he invited them to his own house.

The phrase "at home" would suggest that the man shared the same residence with his parents in this context.

══════════════════════════════════════════════

I agree that "not home" is perfectly natural (without the "at") for this use.

I also agree with the inference that "his house" refers to the house where he lives with his parents.

I submit, however, that the man did not necessarily want his parents to meet his friends. Rather, I suspect he was taking advantage of his parents' absence, enjoying the opportunity to participate in some clandestine or "unauthorized" activities with his friends.

The ancient adage is: "While the cat's away, the mice will play."

This was my first thought as well, though either interpretation is possible: A (somewhat older?) young man, living on his own, wishing to introduce friends to his parents. In this case, the parents reside in a separate location. Or, a (somewhat younger, perhaps not fully adult?) young man, residing with his parents. In this case it suggests a party without parental / adult supervision (or interference, as the young man would likely think).
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