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With the uncertainties Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 4:11:54 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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With the uncertainties NHS is facing, it is imperative to look for alternative. Private medical insurance is the solution. You will be eligible to:

✔ Choose from 24,000 consultants
I saw the above on Facebook.
How do I parse the "with the uncertainties NHS is facing"?
With:
Preposition
The uncertainties, the noun, an object of the preposition "with"
Nhs: subject
Is: auxiliary verb
Facing: main verb

Is it the clause as it has the subject and verb or just a prepositional phrase?
thar
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 4:26:19 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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Look at what clause the verb is actually in:

The brackets are purely to for me to highlight the structure - I am not saying it should be written with brackets.


With the uncertainties that the NHS is facing, it is imperative to look for an alternative.

With the uncertainties (that the NHS is facing), it is imperative to look for an alternative.


[If you copied this accurately, it is bad English again. 'The NHS' is a singular noun, and since there is only one, it takes the definite article. 'Alternative' is a countable noun, and you need to say 'an alternative' or 'alternatives'. And the structure chosen is not good - the adverbial is about the NHS, but they are talking about private insurance. Sloppy writing. Don't trust the quality of language you read on Facebook!]

So what is your clause?
What is the adverbial phrase?

With the uncertainties (that the NHS is facing), it is imperative to look for an alternative.

It is imperative to look for an alternative, with the uncertainties (that the NHS is facing).

Jigneshbharati
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 4:29:52 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 1,870
Neurons: 10,642
Thanks. Should there be "that" before "NHS"?
I really appreciate your help!
thar
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 4:30:50 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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No, you can often omit 'that' in those sorts of clauses - I just put it in to show clearly that it was the start of a clause.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 7:06:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
This is an example of a phrase "With the uncertainties the NHS is facing" which contains a clause "Which the NHS is facing" or "that the NHS is facing" (or 'reduced clause' "the NHS is facing").

Hopefully you have worked it out from thar's questions.

"(which/that) the NHS is facing" is acting as an (adjectival) relative clause - it describes "uncertainties".

"With the uncertainties the NHS is facing" is acting as an (adverbial) preposition phrase (it says why there must be an alternative).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 7:58:31 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 1,870
Neurons: 10,642
Thanks
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