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Should the "and" be capitalised? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, September 8, 2018 7:02:28 PM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
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When someone says "Would you mind helping me with the washing-up?", what will we say when we agree to help? and what should we say when we don't agree to help?

Should the "and" be capitalised?

Thanks.
ozok
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 3:42:49 AM
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Joined: 7/24/2018
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1. ‘Sure, of course’ OR ‘No worries’.

2. Fcuk off! Get a dishwasher. (this sort of expression was once considered to be offensive – now it’s become common)

3. It is the usual procedure to start a sentence with a capital letter.



just sayin'
lazarius
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 4:11:23 AM

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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
ozok wrote:
3. It is the usual procedure to start a sentence with a capital letter.

It is a tricky question if the question mark marks the end of the sentence. Especially if one doesn't want to start a new one with and.

For example, I'm now reading this book:

https://books.google.com/books?id=nAw6AQAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&q=%22and%20that%20the%20soul%22

Quote:
Shall I skulk and dodge and duck with my unseasonable apologies and vain modesty and imagine my being here impertinent? less pertinent than Epaminondas or Homer being there? and that the soul did not know its own needs?


--

Не надо отчаиваться, товарищ.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 6:48:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Lazarius is right - it's tricky. Joining two questions with a conjunction is not simple.

One could make it "one question asked in two opposite ways", like this
When someone says "Would you mind helping me with the washing-up?", what should we say when we agree to help and (what should we say) when we don't (agree to help)?

If there is a pause - the speaker asks the first question, then thinks for a second and asks the second one - I think it would be OK to use 'And'.

When someone says "Would you mind helping me with the washing-up?", what will we say when we agree to help?
And what should we say when we don't agree to help?


I suppose that, to be very certain of being perfectly correct, one should use some other word or phrase.

When someone says "Would you mind helping me with the washing-up?", what will we say when we agree to help?
Also, what should we say when we don't agree to help?



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 8:35:24 AM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
ozok wrote:

.

2. Fcuk off! Get a dishwasher. (this sort of expression was once considered to be offensive – now it’s become common)





WRONG! It STILL is offensive and we don't need it here!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Sunday, September 9, 2018 9:42:58 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 4,376
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Thanks to all of you, especially DragOnspeaker, for his detailed reply.
Romany
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 8:27:21 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,548
Neurons: 45,447
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Just an explanation of the contradictions between Ozok's and Wilmar's responses.

Yes, Ozok is completely correct - the response he gave IS a very common one in modern English. And especially among those under about 35. As this is a domestic and not a formal setting (squabbling over the washing up), it most likely would be said with a huge laugh. It's common banter.

Wilmar is right that in some parts of America, there are some people who find this word - and others like "Communism", "Socialism", "Ignorance", "Atheism" etc. - offensive. This is valuable information for anyone who is going to visit those sorts of places in America.

It's hardly possible however, to shape one's English vocabularly leaving out words which might possibly offend some person, somewhere, some time. The whole point of learning English vocab. is learning HOW to use English in the Real World - not according to any individual lexicon. We all have words or phrases we don't like ourselves.

If personal adversions to a particular word were to influence their usage we'd hardly be able to communicate in English at all. I, for example, loathe and detest the words "physician" for 'Doctor', or "individual" for 'person', or "bosom" in any circumstances. If I were to instructs TFD-ers that they were not needed because I myself found them offensive, other people would jump in with words they didn't like... and soon none of us would be able to talk to each other!

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