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Irish Gaelic question. Options
alwaysbp
Posted: Friday, June 12, 2009 11:16:24 AM
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Joined: 6/12/2009
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United States
i'm new here. i've read the terms and guidelines and hope my question meets the requirements. i have searched many sites regarding Irish Gaelic but have come up empty and/or confused. my research has shown me that Celtic languages are extremely complex. i will offer a list of words/phrases here with which i need help. i need proper usage and pronunciation. 1) "sit!" (a command) - i've narrowed it to 'suigh' but no pronunciation; 2) "play" (not a stage play) - i have 'imir' but no pronunciation; 3) "wrestle" - i have 'bheith ag coraiocht'. is there not a one-word translation?; 4) "no!" (a command) - i have 'nil' but no pronunciation; 5) "good girl(s)!" - singular and plural; 6) "come here!"; 7) "stand down!" or "stop!" (commands). any help with these would be much appreciated. thanks in advance!
Betsy D.
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 11:42:46 AM

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Joined: 3/18/2009
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Neurons: 558
Location: Pennsylvania
Training Celtic dogs are you? Wish I could help... alas...it'll be interesting to see what you find out!

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." -- Mark Twain
Luftmarque
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 2:02:20 PM

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I'm guessing this is for a play or something. I'll ask my sister, she's active in the dog world.

}- Luftmarque لوفتمارك -{ Le doute n'est pas une condition agréable, mais la certitude est absurde.—Voltaire
Angel-Baby
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 11:28:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/11/2009
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Location: Minnesota
iTunes has some Gaelic podcasts that might help. There are some for actually learning the language and some that are news/ entertainment.
anemonie
Posted: Monday, July 27, 2009 7:56:34 PM
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Joined: 7/27/2009
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Location: United Kingdom
i can help you to a certain extent - i took irish language at gcse level,so i know the translation for some of the phrases you need :)

1)i'm pretty sure "sit there" is pronounced "see shais!",but as it's in the form of a sentence,"sit" could be something slightly different - probably "suigh",but still pronunced "see".
2)"imir" is play as a verb.it's pronounced "immir",kinda like "dimmer".
3)not sure to be honest :/
4)there's no actual word in gaelic for "no". the negative response to something usually involves the word "nil",but it doesn't make actual sense used on it's own.if you can sort of lengthen the command to include the subject,it works,for example "nil bi ag ceanch" means "no talking",so you'll need to add the verb i suppose.
5)"good girls" is "cailin go deas" (pronounced "cal-yeen go jass").i'm pretty sure it's the same way for both plural and singular.
6)i can't remember "come here" either :/
7)i think there's a few ways to say "stop" in irish,but one that i remember is "stad"? if that's correct,and in the right context to what you're looking for,it's pronounced "stadj"

i hope these have been of some help,although of course,the pronounciation will depend on your accent and how you say the phonetics.i just assumed you were english and sort of tried to pronounce them correctly in my head lol.
krissyel
Posted: Saturday, August 22, 2009 10:26:26 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/22/2009
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Location: United States
Hi, I may have a few helpful sites for you which I will post.
As far as your question,this is what I have...
sit = suigh sios or sui sios...pronounced see sheese.
play = imir...pronounced immer.
wrestle = coraiocht...bheith ag before this means "to" wrestle..sorry but I'm not sure about the pronunciation at this point.
no = nil...pronounced kneel.
good girl = cailin go dea or deas...pronounced calyeen go djas.
come here = a theacht anseo...pronounced ahacht enshahh.
stop = stad pronounced stahd.
stand down = tarraing siar sorry but not sure of the pronounciation. The following sites may prove useful to you for future questions you may have. Good luck.
http://www.irishdictionary.ie
http://english.glendale.cc.ca.us/gaelic.html
http://www.daltai.com/home.htm
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/
dtpostel
Posted: Wednesday, October 07, 2009 4:30:27 PM

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Joined: 7/16/2009
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Neurons: 1,310
Very interesting reading this tread is. Good Luck...
Klaas V
Posted: Thursday, April 21, 2011 1:12:18 PM

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What does this mean?


Ní mór dúinn daoine a ghlacadh de réir mar atá siad, ní mar ba chóir dóibh a bheith.


With maybe the exception of the unasked there just isn't such thing available as a dumb question - Z4us
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, May 02, 2011 9:53:17 AM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Google translation gives this: We must take people as they are, not as they should be.

Translation to Finnish gave a similar result only with a poor structure of the sentence.

Where's GabhSigenod?


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
GabhSigenod
Posted: Monday, May 02, 2011 10:29:36 PM

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Joined: 12/22/2010
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Location: Mulroog, Connaught, Ireland
A cousin mentioned to me today he saw my name mentioned on the forum. Thanks to many who helped with comlinks, satelite uplinks, and transfers, I am able to respond. And thanks especially to my cousins in the states for putting this message on the website. I find myself on an ice cutter, documenting some operations, lets just say somewhere north of Siberia. But someone said "Where there is a will, there is a way."

So the subject is linguistics. Thank you newbie alwaysbp for your question.


I have no direct translation for "wrestle", context is everything.
Like "to battle" - a cath
"fighting" - troda
"strive/attempt" - iarraht

"sit" - sui
"play" - spraoi (fun)
"no" - aon
"girl" - cailin
"girls" - cailini
"good" - dea
"good girls" - cailini dea
"stop" - stad
"come here" - teacht anseo
"stand down" - seasamh sios

Now pronunciation is entirely another matter.
There are three main dialects of Gaelic: Ulster, Munster , and Donegal.(with Ulster being the major one).
I have spoken similar to the Donegal dialect most of my life, but am migrating somewhat to Ulster, so people can understand my jibberish.(Is that an English word?).
You will find that pronunciation is very complicated, but don't let that deter you.
There are vowels that are long and short, consonants that are broad, slender, eclipsed, doubled, and aspirated.
You will even find a consonant that is not a consonant at all, but an operation, along with diphthongs and accents.
And there are any number of exceptions to the rules. Prununciation is all local but you can follow some basic rules.
For your beginning purposes pronounce the words as they are spelled, until you are more familiar.
Go to standingstones.com/gaelpron.html for a good start on the rules. I hope I helped you some and didn't damage
your curiosity.

GabhSigenod Ahh just call me "Gaw Seynaut" you guys.

Mise, tá mé lán de dea-fhortún.
rosco
Posted: Friday, July 15, 2011 7:37:45 AM

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Joined: 7/15/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United States, CA
All -
I'm training an English Pointer. It is time for me to pick voice commands. it seems easiest if i found a language i didn't speak. it seems Gaelic in the Ulster dialect would be very cool.
the commands that i want are:
"Good" - aon (djas)
"Stop" or "Whoa" - stad (stahd)
"Come Here" - teacht anseo (ahacht enshahh)
"hunt 'em up" - ________ (___)

i'm only missing one, "hunt." i'd like to find a short version of "come here," or "here." is "teacht" short for "here?"

the only way i'll be able to use these with correctness (as best i can muster) is to here them pronounced. Google translation has a pronunciation but i don't see it translates english into gaelic of any dialect. how could i hear these words pronounced? i prefer to hear the pronunciations online.

Thank you in advance,
rosco

I'm curious if the IRA is real or if it is another CIA false-flag operation. PM me if you wish.
GabhSigenod
Posted: Saturday, December 03, 2011 8:26:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2010
Posts: 2,376
Neurons: 149,736
Location: Mulroog, Connaught, Ireland
Work is being conducted with speech synthesis for use by the public with beta version of synthesizer at Trinity University Dublin.
Go to http://www.abair.tcd.ie for help with your request. The site content is presented in both Gaelic and English.
The sound you generate will depend upon your own operating system and browser. Spelling is extremely important.
Study first the FAQ on the website. Sorry, no individual dialect is specified for the public at this time.
Your success with the dog training lies with your pronunciation training and being completely consistent with the dog when it comes to the "sound"of each commands.
This all sounds like a lot of work, so good luck.

Mise, tá mé lán de dea-fhortún.
seánínóg
Posted: Thursday, January 26, 2012 11:50:01 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/26/2012
Posts: 1
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Location: United Kingdom
ClubFavolosa wrote:
What does this mean?


Ní mór dúinn daoine a ghlacadh de réir mar atá siad, ní mar ba chóir dóibh a bheith.


We must take people as they are, not as we want them to be. Ádh mór ort, a Fhavolosa! If you're learning Irish, you'll need a slice of luck...
Kimpossi72
Posted: Saturday, June 02, 2012 8:01:17 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/2/2012
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United States, AZ
I have a question, and there is a story behind it.

A friend of ours went to a Scottish highland game here in Phx and got my mom's boyfriend a t-shirt from there. And the t-shirt reads: Tha sinn a'toirt taing airson latha eile far an urrain dhuinn tilgeadh!

Yes I know its Gaelic, and I've tried translators. It didn't work. Can someone help translate this?
Please and thank you.
Klaas V
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2012 3:11:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/12/2010
Posts: 1,341
Neurons: 4,802
Kimpossi72 wrote
Tha sinn a'toirt taing airson latha eile far an urrain dhuinn tilgeadh
I'm afraid it takes some extra time and a slice of luck < to quote seánínóg

This is the Irish Gaelic, not exactly the same as the Scottish variation

With maybe the exception of the unasked there just isn't such thing available as a dumb question - Z4us
Aonghas
Posted: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 6:02:58 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/13/2013
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Kim,

Tha sinn a'toirt taing airson latha eile far an urrain dhuinn tilgeadh - is Scottish gaelic and means: We give thanks for another day in which we can throw. I put it on the Throwers shirts and has been used at several games in Arizona for several years.

Brent
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