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Blunt-spoken, coarse-tongued, profane? Options
Parpar1836
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:45:38 PM
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I've been struggling to find an adjective that succinctly describes a character in a play who uses a lot of profanity, and who is upfront and outspoken about her feelings. Foul-mouthed doesn't feel right. I currently have blunt-talking, but I'm not entirely sure about that. I have already checked the thesaurus listings on TFD, but am wondering if my intrepid colleagues on the Forum may have a zippier, zingier suggestion or two.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 4:14:16 PM

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How about forthright or frank?

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 5:55:55 PM

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Parpar1836 wrote:
I've been struggling to find an adjective that succinctly describes a character in a play who uses a lot of profanity, and who is upfront and outspoken about her feelings. Foul-mouthed doesn't feel right. I currently have blunt-talking, but I'm not entirely sure about that. I have already checked the thesaurus listings on TFD, but am wondering if my intrepid colleagues on the Forum may have a zippier, zingier suggestion or two.


How about habitually maledictory and coarsely blunt?
BuffaloBill
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 6:09:14 PM
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colorfully direct?
palapaguy
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 9:59:48 PM

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Crude? Coarse? Blunt? In-your-face?
FounDit
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:29:55 PM

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Parpar1836 wrote:
I've been struggling to find an adjective that succinctly describes a character in a play who uses a lot of profanity, and who is upfront and outspoken about her feelings. Foul-mouthed doesn't feel right. I currently have blunt-talking, but I'm not entirely sure about that. I have already checked the thesaurus listings on TFD, but am wondering if my intrepid colleagues on the Forum may have a zippier, zingier suggestion or two.


Foul-mouthed is an accurate description of someone who uses profanity excessively, and coarse describes someone who is blunt and lacks refinement in social skills.

So, perhaps a coarse, foul-mouthed individual?


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 14, 2018 1:05:39 PM
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I think BuffaloBill's suggestion of "colourfully direct" is the best. Being up-front and outspoken is being direct. There's nothing coarse or crude about it: it describes someone who is honest about their feelings and doesn't hide them behind platitudes or meaningless banalities. You know where you are with people like that: what you see is what you get.

As for the swearing bit? That's cultural. My experiences around the world have shown me that those who still find swearing "profane" or call it "using cuss words" are usually elderly or come from religious or highly conservative backgrounds.

There are also a few groups of people who think swearing is just something men do and that, for some reason, that's "manly" and forgivable, but if a woman does it it's coarse and the sky will fall on our heads.

So it would depend on who it is your description is aimed at?

If it's the last group, I wouldn't worry: it's a ridiculously outmoded concept - and they are probably not play-goers anyway. If it's religious and conservative people - also usually not avid modern theatre-goers either - a woman who was forthright and direct probably wouldn't appeal... without one even mentioning their vocabulary. But if it's people who regularly go to plays or engage in other kinds of cultural entertainment "colourful" signals that this person will probably swear, and is a bit of a character, but would add interest to the character line-up.

Whatever one writes and whomever one is writing for, what one says has always to be tailored to the expected readership.
Parpar1836
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:32:16 PM
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Location: Rochester, New York, United States
First of all, thank you for your colorfully direct suggestions.

I'm writing a story about a production, Arrival & Departure, which just opened at Fountain Theatre, Los Angeles. It's directed and scripted by Stephen Sachs, loosely based on the classic British film Brief Encounter. I saw the movie online, twice, and am certainly game for seeing it again, even though I know how it ends.

Those of you who've seen Brief Encounter know that it's about two respectable married middle-class persons—Laura, a 30-ish/40-ish mother, and Alec, a doctor—who meet at a suburban railway station's Refreshment Room (a tearoom/snack bar/waiting place/lounge) by chance, and fall in love, but ultimately decide that they cannot pursue the affair. Alec accepts an offer to move to Johannesburg, South America, which means that he and Laura will likely never see each other again, and they can't stay in contact through letters.

The film in notable for its absolutely convincing performances and David Lean's moody camera work. It was made in 1945, towards the end of the war, but is set in 1938, just before the war broke out. Noël Coward produced the film and wrote the script (which is based on his short play Still Life).

Laura and Alec's serious, sorrowful, increasingly guilt-ridden relationship is contrasted to that of a working-class couple employed at the station: Myrtle is barista at the Refreshment Room, and Albert is a ticket-collector-guard. Their courtship is notably unsecret. They exchange lines about dating quite openly. Albert demands a kiss across the counter, and in so doing, knocks a pile of sweet buns to the floor. Myrtle has a dignity about her that is quite disarming. We know that she and Albert will be fine.

In Sachs's revisioning, the suburban Refreshment Room is replaced by a Dunkin' Donuts in a New York City subway station. Instead of Laura and Alec, there are Emily and Sam, who are played by Deaf actors Deanne Bray and Troy Kotsur, who, in real life, are married to each other. Emily, who's hard-of-hearing but wants to explore her Deaf identity, has a hearing husband, Doug, and unhappy teenage daughter who becomes the victim of a classmate's cruel prank on a teen dating site.

And instead of Myrtle and Albert, there's Mya and Russell. Mya is a food-service worker who presides over the coffeeshop counter. Russell is a security guard. Mya, who is partly Filipina, has an most uninhibited mouth. She is the character I'm trying to describe. Her language is colorfully direct, to be sure, liberally peppered with profanity. Russell is trying to persuade her to come with him on a date, but she's reluctant. (Definitely not maledictory, but she's been hurt before, and has a cynical attitude towards Russell's overtures.) The back-and-forth between these characters makes a good counterpoint to the friendship between Emily and Sam, which deepens to love but jeopardizes their families. Still, they are re-energized. Sam decides to pursue his put-on-hold career as a filmmaker, and Emily takes a more assertive role in her family.
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