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higher education vs tertiary education Options
D00M
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 10:47:18 AM

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Hello respected teachers,

Could you please explain the difference between higher education and tertiary education? I googled the two but am still in doubt about the exact difference. Also, what is the difference between the two above and "further education"?

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
thar
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 1:01:23 PM

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I think it will depend very much on what country you are talking about, but from a British English standpoint

Tertiary education is all education past the compulsory education age of 16.
In England (it differs throughout the UK) you have primary (4-11) secondary (11-16) and tertiary education at 16+, which is not compulsory.



Tertiary education is the broad term for anything which is post secondary education - after your standard 'school leaving certificate' level. What age that is depends on the country, - 14?, 16, 18. So that is college, trade school, university. Anything post-secondary.


In UK categories, at least:
Further education happens at a college, where you study for a qualification which is less than a degree. Includes academic studies and vocational training.
Higher education happens at a university (which may have 'college' in its name but is a university) and is towards a degree.

Just my take on it - not an official definition - but then I guess you have already looked at those!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 1:30:08 PM
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Agree with Thar that's how it is in the UK - and it's been the same everywhere I've lived. Even in China - even though most of their education nomenclature differed.
NKM
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 4:15:50 PM

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In U.S. parlance, primary education is often called "grade school", "elementary school" or sometimes "grammar school", while the secondary level is usually referred to as "high school".

What comes after high school is generally called "college"; the word "tertiary" is not commonly used here.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 6:13:26 PM

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Also, in Britain, "tertiary education" is not commonly used (unless you are a teacher, educationalist or politician).

Normally, in conversation, people would talk about their children being at 'primary school' or 'secondary school' (which used to be sometimes called 'secondary modern', 'grammar school' or sometimes 'High School' for girls) or 'Academy' in Scotland.
After that it would be "He's going to College" or "She's at uni/university".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 7:10:33 PM

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As others have said, it depends on context.

Among educators and pedagogues, the phrase "tertiary education" would refer to college or university in everyday speech. In that schema, primary refers to grades 1 through 8, secondary grades 9 through 12, and tertiary would be anything beyond. Many school districts in the USA recognize an additional distinction called "middle school" that comprises grades 7 through 9.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 7:30:21 PM

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leonAzul wrote:
Among educators and pedagogues, the phrase "tertiary education" would refer to college or university in everyday speech. In that schema, primary refers to grades 1 through 8, secondary grades 9 through 12, and tertiary would be anything beyond. Many school districts in the USA recognize an additional distinction called "middle school" that comprises grades 7 through 9.

Hi!
Just a question from me here.
I think that "Grades 1 through 8" would mean six-year-olds to fourteen-year-olds, and
"grades 9 through 12" would mean fifteen-year-olds to eighteen-year-olds.

Am I right?

The British system is as thar says, 4-11; 11-16; and adult education.
(Anything above 16 is 'optional extra education')

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 7:46:47 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
leonAzul wrote:
Among educators and pedagogues, the phrase "tertiary education" would refer to college or university in everyday speech. In that schema, primary refers to grades 1 through 8, secondary grades 9 through 12, and tertiary would be anything beyond. Many school districts in the USA recognize an additional distinction called "middle school" that comprises grades 7 through 9.

Hi!
Just a question from me here.
I think that "Grades 1 through 8" would mean six-year-olds to fourteen-year-olds, and
"grades 9 through 12" would mean fifteen-year-olds to eighteen-year-olds.

Am I right?

The British system is as thar says, 4-11; 11-16; and adult education.
(Anything above 16 is 'optional extra education')


Yes, that is correct, although there is some flexibility for those born early in the year or late in the year as to which class they would be placed.

Similarly, most States in the USA have statutes that mandate enrollment in a certified school until the age of 16. In other words, completion of a high school diploma is not mandated, although in practice it is a virtual necessity.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 8:09:31 PM

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That is one big difference.
Here, you gets your certs at sixteen/seventeen (as you say, there's some leeway depending on which month you were born in).

It's not one big "diploma" - there are exams in many different subjects and you get a cert for each one you pass.
The exams (and certs) at sixteen are the ones you would use to get a job on leaving school.
Someone with ten GCSEs (or whatever name they give them) in arts and humanities wouldn't qualify for a job as a technician, but someone with six certs in sciences would.

If you do the two extra years and get advanced-level certs, they would count towards college or university entrance requirements.

You get a diploma when you finish your first three years at university (and pass!) or a college course (a couple of years or three).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Parpar1836
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 10:06:54 PM
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As Thar noted, here in the U.S., we commonly use the term post-secondary (or postsecondary) instead of tertiary.

Beyond the secondary level is graduate school, the most advanced track being doctoral studies.
srirr
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 1:37:56 AM

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An interesting thing I see here. Thar mentions categorization of education on the basis of age. I have never seen it that way. In India, we call it primary education (nursery to class V), secondary education (class VI to class X) and higher secondary or senior secondary (class XI and XII). Beyond that, we have colleges or universities which can simply be called higher education or higher studies. The nomenclature is purely grade-based and not age-based. If I am an illiterate and start studying at 25 years of age, I will still be called to having my primary education. This is also called adult education.

The government policy makes the primary and secondary education compulsory for all, but in practicality, all the population may not be literate. (This is a harsh reality. That can be a completely different topic.)

Suppose, I have studied till class VIII and discontinued studies after that for some reasons. I rejoin class IX when I am 30 years of age, then I am still completing my secondary education.

We do not have the terminology of 'tertiary education'.


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
NKM
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 8:35:39 AM

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Parpar1836 wrote:

Beyond the secondary level is graduate school, the most advanced track being doctoral studies.

Far beyond the secondary level, I think. "Grad school" usually comes after four years of college (Bachelor degree), working toward an advanced degree (Master or Doctor).

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