The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Participle Options
D00M
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 11:14:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,249
Neurons: 6,197
Hello respected teachers,

The Navajo singer sweeps the send painting away. Then he Returns the sand to the landscape.

I want to change the second sentence into a participle and merge it into the first one. Is the following okay?

The Navajo singer sweeps the sand painting away, then returning the sand to the landscape.

I think "then" is redundant there, however.

I am looking forward to your answers.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 11:25:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,519
Neurons: 170,196
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes - the "returning" phrase shows that the action occurs along with "sweeps the sand painting away".

The two actions are together (basically they happen at the same time or, at least, in the same time-period).

"Then" is not really needed and does not fit well with the participle phrase.

The Navajo singer sweeps the sand painting away, then returns the sand to the landscape.
The Navajo singer sweeps the sand painting away, returning the sand to the landscape.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 2:06:24 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 293
Neurons: 2,306
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The Navajo singer sweeps the sand painting away, then returns the sand to the landscape.

The pedantic side of me considers that a comma splice. That side would insert an 'and' before the 'then.
D00M
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 2:17:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,249
Neurons: 6,197
Same here, Bobshilling, but as far as I have searched about it, it has become too common both in speaking and writing to be able to call it an error.
But strictly speaking, yes, it's a comma splice sine "then" is not a conjunction there, but an adverb.

I am looking forward to your answers.
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 2:47:27 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 293
Neurons: 2,306
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
D00M wrote:
Same here, Bobshilling, but as far as I have searched about it, it has become too common both in speaking and writing to be able to call it an error.


I did say 'the pedantic side of me'. I am old and old-fashioned enough not to write something like that, but I almost certainly say it. I would still call it an error for the sake of those learners who may be taking examinations in places where teachers/examiners might well deduct marks for such foul sins.
D00M
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 3:18:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,249
Neurons: 6,197
Thanks for being knowledgeable and helpful, Bobshilling. You are certainly a perfect teacher.

I am looking forward to your answers.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 3:52:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,673
Neurons: 244,150
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Actually, nobody's perfect.

But BobShilling is certainly worth listening to.

Applause
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 4:36:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,519
Neurons: 170,196
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Somehow, my teachers never mentioned "comma splices", this type of construction was never corrected (grammar school level, 1961 to 1966).
Thank you Bob.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Audiendus
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 8:18:56 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 4,988
Neurons: 874,796
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
BobShilling wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The Navajo singer sweeps the sand painting away, then returns the sand to the landscape.

The pedantic side of me considers that a comma splice. That side would insert an 'and' before the 'then.


Hmm...I wonder. Is it really a comma splice? A comma splice can normally be corrected by changing the comma to a full stop, dash or semicolon, but that is not the case here.

The sentence 'feels' correct to me (note that there is no "he" before "returns"). It would not have crossed my mind that there might be something wrong with it.
BobShilling
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:50:15 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 293
Neurons: 2,306
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Audiendus wrote:


Hmm...I wonder. Is it really a comma splice? A comma splice can normally be corrected by changing the comma to a full stop, dash or semicolon, but that is not the case here.

The sentence 'feels' correct to me (note that there is no "he" before "returns"). It would not have crossed my mind that there might be something wrong with it.


Interesting. The more I read that sentence, the less incorrect it sounds to me.
NKM
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 8:41:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,673
Neurons: 244,150
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
I'm with Audiendus on this one. I've never heard of a "comma splice", but there's nothing wrong with that sentence.

BobShilling
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:06:23 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 293
Neurons: 2,306
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
NKM
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:40:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,673
Neurons: 244,150
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Thanks for that link. It confirms what I had assumed what a "comma splice" must be.

I've probably used commas in that way (more or less), but only in forming a list of successive clauses.

"I came, I saw her, and all was lost."

Audiendus
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 7:39:57 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 4,988
Neurons: 874,796
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
NKM wrote:
I've probably used commas in that way (more or less), but only in forming a list of successive clauses.

"I came, I saw her, and all was lost."

That is not really a comma splice, because "A, B and C" is correct in general (as is "A and B", but not "A, B" or "A, B, C").

Examples of true comma splices that I would find acceptable are:

Man proposes, God disposes.
It's not yours, it's mine.
You win some, you lose some.
Some like it, some don't.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.