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D00M
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 4:39:25 PM

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Hello respected teachers,

What's the difference between the following two in terms of meaning?

You may have some difficulty in getting to see this film as it is only showing at selected cinemas.

You may have some difficulty in getting to see this film as it is being shown only at selected cinemas

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
BobShilling
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 4:50:13 PM
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Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic

There is no difference. Ideally, 'only' should come before 'at selected cinemas' in the first.
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 6:00:05 PM

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As BobShilling says, "showing only at …" would be better than "only showing at …".

asmartypants
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 11:06:30 PM
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I think it should be showed instead of shown
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 12:20:49 AM
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asmartypants wrote:
I think it should be showed instead of shown

Some dictionaries give 'showed' as an alternative third form (past participle), but 'shown' is far more commonly used.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 3:50:31 AM

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Gosh!
That's one 'alternative fact' which had passed me by completely.

I had never heard of "showed" before.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 4:04:42 AM

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You can find showed, growed, blowed and knowed - and I bet a few more if you tried.
The dictionary labels vary - alternative but not recommended (showed), Dialect/Scots (growed), dialect (blowed) and 'non-standard' (knowed).

Whistle

And of course you have the simple past 'shew' as an archaic version. Talk about inconsistent. No wonder people end up making their own versions! d'oh!
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 4:25:56 AM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I had never heard of "showed" before.


I would have said it was wrong. Fortunately for me, I checked in a couple of dictionaries before I posted.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 4:41:36 AM

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thar wrote:
You can find . . .

Yes - of course, all very regular.

Throw - threw - thrown
grow - grew - grown
show - shew -shown
shoe - shoon
canoe - canoon


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 5:09:09 AM

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Or the second conjugation:
mow, mowed, mown
sow, sowed, sown
show, showed, shown
row, rowed, rown
bow (warp), bowed, bown
tow, towed, town
hoe, hoed, hone.
go, goed, gone



d'oh! Silenced
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 2:37:55 PM
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In Asmartypants defence: Australian English doesn't make much use of 'shown', 'dreamt' 'mown' etc. The average Aussie-speaker would expect to see "showed" in this context.
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 5:35:28 PM

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Who'd-a thunk it?

Whistle
D00M
Posted: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 6:03:53 PM

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"Who would have thought it?"

Have I understood you correctly,NKM?

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 6:40:13 PM

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Yes.

I'm glad you got it! It's obviously not good English, but we use a lot of "bad" stuff just for the fun of it.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 3:35:57 AM

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Well done D00M.

"Thunk" is an (incorrect) past participle, following the pattern of "drink".

I drink, I drank, I have drunk
I think, I thank, I have thunk.

d'oh!

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 5:27:47 AM

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In Icelandic there are two words
þenk/ja v ( -ti, -t)

To think, reflect, consider
Cogitate, muse

And
þyk/ja v ( þótti, þótt)

To think, believe, hold an opinion, assert

(vera talinn) be regarded, be thought to be,


It does look a bit like English may have had two words at some time in the past and has combined the two. Think

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