The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

great cry and little wool Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, July 6, 2018 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 25,213
Neurons: 74,817
Location: Inside Farlex computers
great cry and little wool

A great deal of fuss, noise, fanfare, or protestation over something of little or no substance, importance, or relevance. More...

KSPavan
Posted: Friday, July 6, 2018 5:14:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 4,198
Neurons: 2,608,696
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Idiom of the Day
great cry and little wool — A great deal of fuss, noise, fanfare, or protestation over something of little or no substance, importance, or relevance.
Ricardo Althaus
Posted: Friday, July 6, 2018 6:46:16 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/2/2017
Posts: 1
Neurons: 64,236
Location: Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Is it possible to tell if this idiom has been casted in Britain or America, Thanks to everyone
monamagda
Posted: Friday, July 6, 2018 1:12:34 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 6,640
Neurons: 4,563,965
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
tomcrossson
Posted: Friday, July 6, 2018 1:19:18 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 12/8/2014
Posts: 59
Neurons: 33,611
Location: Twain Harte, California, United States
[quote=Daemon]great cry and little wool

A great deal of fuss, noise, fanfare, or protestation over something of little or no substance, importance, or relevance. More...

[/quot

Never heard that one before. The one I recall is "don't make a big (deal)thing out of nothing." - [TH]
thar
Posted: Friday, July 6, 2018 4:46:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 17,709
Neurons: 71,621
Never heard it either.

Wool used to be the most valuable export of England, and made it possibly the richest country in western Europe, so it is a reasonable idiom to relate fuss to an amount of wool - but I have never heard this.

Yep - Mediaeval wool is the reference, apparently


Quote:
It's a mediaeval proverb, first recorded in 1475. "Cry" here has the sense "shouting"; mediaeval traders "cried their wares" in the streets. The expression means that a lot of noise and fanfare is being made about something that actually has little substance or importance.



I guess the idiom went out of fashion at some point.
I think most people nowadays outside of mill towns don't realise how important wool was in English history.
Quote:


English wools, particularly from the Welsh Marches, the South West and Lincolnshire, were the most prized in medieval Europe.[8] It was exported to the emergent urban centres of cloth production of the Low Countries, France, and Italy, where production was promoted by the adoption of the pedal-driven horizontal loom and spinning wheel, along with mechanised fulling and napping.[9]

In 1280 about 25,000 sacks of wool were exported from England; trade in raw wool peaked around 40,000–45,000 sacks per year, falling to 33,000 in 1355 and 9,706 in 1476 as exports changed to finished cloth. As exports of raw wool fell, exports of cloths rose, from 10,000 cloths per year in 1349–50 to 60,000 in 1446–47, and c. 140,000 in 1539–40.[10] 'By the end of the thirteenth century, the heavily industrialised areas of Europe could not have existed without the export of English wool.'[11]
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.