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"Ich bin ein Berliner" (1963) Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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"Ich bin ein Berliner" (1963)

In 1963, US President John F. Kennedy traveled to West Berlin to show support for those living behind the Berlin Wall, hemmed in by Soviet-controlled East Germany. Considered a key moment in the Cold War, Kennedy's speech boosted morale for West Germans, who feared Communist occupation. Kennedy was apparently coached on the pronunciation of the famous line "Ich bin ein Berliner"—"I am a Berliner"—just before taking the stage. Why has it been reported that he in fact said "I am a jelly doughnut"? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 3:55:40 AM

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"Ich bin ein Berliner" (1963)
In 1963, US President John F. Kennedy traveled to West Berlin to show support for those living behind the Berlin Wall, hemmed in by Soviet-controlled East Germany. Considered a key moment in the Cold War, Kennedy's speech boosted morale for West Germans, who feared Communist occupation. Kennedy was apparently coached on the pronunciation of the famous line "Ich bin ein Berliner"—"I am a Berliner"—just before taking the stage.
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 3:55:41 AM

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This Day in History
"Ich bin ein Berliner" (1963)
In 1963, US President John F. Kennedy traveled to West Berlin to show support for those living behind the Berlin Wall, hemmed in by Soviet-controlled East Germany. Considered a key moment in the Cold War, Kennedy's speech boosted morale for West Germans, who feared Communist occupation. Kennedy was apparently coached on the pronunciation of the famous line "Ich bin ein Berliner"—"I am a Berliner"—just before taking the stage.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 4:18:39 AM

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Ah, those pesky articles like 'ein', and the meaning they add. Whistle
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 9:09:23 AM

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Harry Truman should have stricken blow for civilization by nuking that jerk of Joe Stalin. Would have saved the world much trouble.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 6:10:10 PM

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Did JFK actually say he was a jelly doughnut? Find out the real translation of “Ich bin ein Berliner.”

In June, 1963, John F. Kennedy made either the most important speech of the Cold War era or the most well known pastry-related blunder of all time. JFK’s “Ich bin ein Berliner” speech is an oration celebrated not only for its message against Soviet domination but also for its alleged assertion that the president of the United States was a jelly doughnut. Is there any truth to that legend? Not really, but the doughnut—or Berliner” in question is delicious, so we’re taking a close look at it this week.

The misconception arose from the fact that Kennedy supposed should have said, “Ich bin Berliner.” Adding the indefinite article “ein” implied that the speaker is a Berliner, which isn’t a citizen of Berlin at all but instead a jelly-filled doughnut popular in Germany and Central Europe. However, Kennedy wasn’t speaking as a literal person living in Berlin but in a figurative sense, where the “ein” is still necessary. Additionally, those jelly doughnuts aren’t even known as “Berliners” in Berlin: They’re called Pfannkuchen instead. No self respecting West Berliner listening to that speech would have confused Kennedy’s words.

The Pfannkuchen itself is enjoyed throughout the world, and known by many different names. Italians eat krapfen with their morning coffee, Hungarians munch on fanks, and diners in the American Midwest might chow down on a bismark, but it’s all the same pastry: a fat, fried dough ball stuffed with jam or pastry cream. The doughnut’s German origins come from a celebratory pastry offered primarily during New Year’s. If you happen to be at a German New Year’s party where the doughnuts are being served, look out: it’s a common practical joke to fill some with mustard instead of jelly to trick unsuspecting guests.

BY STEPHANIE BUTLER

https://www.history.com/news/i-am-a-jelly-doughnut-or-am-i
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