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looking for an idiom Options
robjen
Posted: Monday, June 18, 2018 8:06:24 PM
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Suppose that someone feels too embarrassed to ask you for help directly. They tell you a long story why they need your help, such as borrowing money from you.

I have heard of an idiom like "take you around the park". I think it's exactly right. Please tell me what the right idiom is.

Thanks a lot.
Hope123
Posted: Monday, June 18, 2018 9:14:02 PM

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Hi Robjen.

I have not heard that particular saying, but when we mean 'to swindle' we say 'to take you for a ride'. If you mean they think you are a person who is easily cheated or deceived, then we say 'to sucker you', or to find you as 'an easy mark', or they 'string you along', or they 'conned' you.

If deceit is not in the equation, then they just 'tell you a big long story'.

There are probably lots more single words and also idioms that others may add. It depends upon what exactly you wish to say.

The past is to be respected/acknowledged, not worshipped. It is in our future we will find our greatness. Pierre Trudeau
robjen
Posted: Monday, June 18, 2018 10:09:01 PM
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Thanks, Hope123. I don't mean they are trying to cheat you.

For example, your ex-friend is studying for a major physics exam. He has a lot of trouble with some abstract concepts. He has been trying as

hard as he can to prepare for it. He has been using lots of library books and online resources to learn the concepts. But, he still doesn't

understand them. You are a physics tutor and can help him. He now needs your help. One day, he comes to you, makes an apology, and tells you

how hard he has been trying to prepare for the exam. He is too embarrassed to tell you directly that he needs your help. After a half-hour

story, he goes right to the point and asks you for help.



I have heard of an idiom like "take you around the park" or "take you out on a long walk" meaning you are not going right to the point or talking

directly. What is the correct idiom?

srirr
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 1:27:03 AM

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You are probably looking for "beating around the bush."


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 6:25:40 AM
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That would be the one that springs to mind, Srirr.

We also use "round (and round) the houses". But I don't think it's used in America?
Annelise Carlsen
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 8:04:51 AM

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In Danish and Swedish we have another idiom: "to circle round the hot porridge like a cat"! ;-)
Naturally, the hot porridge being a symbol of the delicate subject which will sooner or later become cold enough to touch.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 8:16:42 AM

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Annelise Carlsen wrote:
In Danish and Swedish we have another idiom: "to circle round the hot porridge like a cat"! ;-)
Naturally, the hot porridge being a symbol of the delicate subject which will sooner or later become cold enough to touch.


In Finnish we have exactly the same expression: Kiertää kuin kissa kuumaa puuroa. Of course, the Swedes or Danes can't understand a bit of that ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 8:17:59 AM

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As srirr meantioned, I came up with "beat around the bush" as well.
I will support that.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 10:18:58 AM

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Yes, Robjen, to beat around the bush is good. It means to stall or hedge. To take you around the park reminded me of taking you for a ride which is not what you meant.

From dictionaries - To beat around the bush means to approach indirectly, in a roundabout way, or too cautiously, or to speak evasively or misleadingly, or to stall or waste time.

It comes from how they flush pheasants and other birds so they could be shot, British gamekeepers hired beaters who would swing sticks at likely places where the birds might be lurking. Not to go directly to such foliage but to work around it instead gave the impression of wasting time or not trying very hard to raise the birds; hence, beating around the bush.


Other phrases could be to dance around or give the run around, but to beat around the bush is the best.

The past is to be respected/acknowledged, not worshipped. It is in our future we will find our greatness. Pierre Trudeau
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 10:46:46 AM

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When I was younger I would actually beat around the bush, my dad would take my older brother and myself on shoot as we were too young to really take part we would be put somewhere on the edge of of the fields with our beating sticks.



I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 2:36:32 PM
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Wow Sarries!

What fabulous - and unusual now - experiences you've had!

The number of people who've had that kind of childhood is shrinking as time goes by, isn't it?
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 3:25:18 PM

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Romany wrote:
Wow Sarries!

What fabulous - and unusual now - experiences you've had!

The number of people who've had that kind of childhood is shrinking as time goes by, isn't it?


Ditto!

The past is to be respected/acknowledged, not worshipped. It is in our future we will find our greatness. Pierre Trudeau
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 2:16:13 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
It often bemuses my friends and neighbours when I refer to the place where we live as "the village" it's now a suburban area of Luton but to my family it's the place where we have lived for centuries. The life that my father had and began to teach my brother and myself about is now almost gone as what were fields are now housing estates, schools and other services.



I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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