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about this idiom Options
robjen
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 10:56:53 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/17/2015
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I have heard some people say this.

(ex) We got your back covered.

What does this idiom mean?

Thanks.
palapaguy
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 11:10:21 PM

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Joined: 10/28/2013
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
It means "We're protecting you from attacks that you might not see coming (because they're coming from a direction you not looking in.)"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 11:11:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It's a military term.

cover vt
7.a. To protect by having within range or by firing a weapon:


It is usually used in team situations (or amongst friends).

One person or group does the 'job' they have to do, while the others watch to make sure no enemy comes up behind them. The others watch their backs - behind them - so they can concentrate on what they're doing,

In more general terms, it means "I/we will support and protect you."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
mactoria
Posted: Friday, June 15, 2018 12:08:11 AM
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Joined: 8/13/2014
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Location: Stockton, California, United States
Americans use the idiom "got your back" as well. Also, American military (also law enforcement personnel who likely borrowed it from previous military service) use the phrase "got your 6" to mean the same thing: the military, particularly pilots in the air force, used the hands of the clock to tell directions, with "6" being right behind a person/plane. Because it's been used in a lot of non-fiction books and police drama TV, "got your 6" has reached some degree of come usage in the US (so much so, there's a band with the name "Got Your Six").
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, June 15, 2018 12:17:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,128
Neurons: 167,141
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi mactoria.

I think it is similar (but slightly more formal) in the RAF - "Missile at ten-o'-clock" is somewhere off to the left.

"At six-o'-clock" would be "right behind me".

It's quite descriptive for people like me who grew up with analogue clocks.

I have a friend who's nearly eleven years old, and she's very bright (speaks English and Hungarian almost like an adult) but she has no idea how to read a clock-face. She grew up with only digital clocks around!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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