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Puteri Husna
Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 7:03:47 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/12/2018
Posts: 3
Neurons: 95
Location: Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
it's truly hard for me to actually seize the moment of myself and to captivate it to make a story regarding my life , how about you ??? 😉

such a lousy writer but i wanna improve that
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 2:58:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,097
Neurons: 167,071
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello Puteri Husna!
Welcome to the forum!

If you want to be a writer, my first advice would be to use proper punctuation.

It's truly hard for me to actually seize the moment of myself and to captivate it to make a story regarding my life. How about you?
(I would probably put another comma after the word "myself", but I don't think that is a 'fixed pattern', it just seems better to me.)

************
However, to answer your question properly, I am not a writer really. This is only based on what I have been told and what I have read.

Two famous authors (writing advice to new authors) have said "You become a writer by writing."
Yes, you can study how to use grammar and how to use all the author's 'tools'. There are many of these - how to use different tenses to express emotion and action - how to 'foreshadow' effectively (mentioning something early in a story which is only explained later) to make the reader continue reading - how to use metaphor effectively to give a story 'colour' - and so on.
You can read a lot, to increase your vocabulary so that you know many different phrases to say one particular thing.
But, to become a writer you have to write.

This is my opinion (not from any expert). You could simply write what has happened today.
Then ('forget' that you are a writer for a moment) assume the viewpoint of a reader, and read it. Is it interesting? Could you think of a better way to say it? Could you make it more interesting?
Then write it again, or write about a different day. (Robert Heinlein says you should not re-write - unless a publisher orders it.)

One writer (I don't remember who - it was one of the famous authors of the "Golden Age of Science Fiction"; Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard or Isaac Asimov) told a story of a "Writers' Guild" party at which someone asked when they had all graduated from writer's college.
The only person who had finished a course at writer's college had never written a book - he was a book-critic.
None of the authors had graduated - they had left before finishing a course, or had never started one.

I personally read a lot of Science Fiction - so these links are to advice from Sci-Fi authors. I've given a quote from each, but check out the full articles.

Robert Heinlein.
Quote:

1. You must write.
2. You must finish what you start.
3. You must refrain from rewriting except to editorial order.
4. You must put it on the market.
5. You must keep it on the market until sold.


L. Ron Hubbard
Quote:

Write and write and write and write. And then when you finish, write some more.

It may not be original advice, but it is still quite true. You learn to write by writing.

Don’t try to learn how to write in order to write. I’ve seen a lot of great writers killed off when they decided they wanted to learn how to write.

Just take an idea and go with it. You may find a story that pulls you along. The story takes off on its own. It sounds silly but it happens. You have this character walking down the street and you are all ready for him to get into a taxi but he walks right on and turns into a movie theatre. Whoa! What is this? Well, follow him and see what happens.


Ursula K. Le Guin
Quote:

‘Adjectives and adverbs are rich and good and fattening. The main thing is not to overindulge.’ As she points out, don’t use a verb and adverb duo where there is a verb that can concisely express in one word what you’re saying with two. Instead of writing ‘she ran hurriedly up the stairs’, you can simply say ‘she hurried up the stairs’. Adverbs can give shape and colour to more abstract actions, though. Compare ‘she thought’ to ‘she thought, wistfully’. If the preceding actual thought is ambiguous, a well-chosen adverb can give the mood and sense you want.

***************
There are many people on this forum who will help with corrections, questions about vocabulary, grammar etc.
But you need to write something - then ask your questions about it.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 11:04:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 713
Neurons: 4,525
it's truly hard for me to actually seize the moment of myself and to captivate it to make a story regarding my life , how about you ??? 😉

Apart from what you have corrected, DragO sir, is the word 'actually' necessary?

I am a layman.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 11:10:22 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,065
Neurons: 43,375
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
I see nothing wrong with the "actually" as this is a very informal post. However, the word "captivate" is the wrong choice in this context and should be "capture".

TMe
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 11:13:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 713
Neurons: 4,525
Thanks Romany.

I am a layman.
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