The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

What would any of us have been, if our fathers hadn't drawed our faculties out of us? Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 24,266
Neurons: 71,976
Location: Inside Farlex computers
What would any of us have been, if our fathers hadn't drawed our faculties out of us?

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 1:25:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 3,576
Neurons: 2,423,710
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Quotation of the Day

What would any of us have been, if our fathers hadn't drawed our faculties out of us?

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
mudbudda669
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 10:12:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/15/2015
Posts: 316
Neurons: 238,916
Location: Tallahassee, Florida, United States
Brick wall
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 12:03:22 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 2,452
Neurons: 171,582
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
What would any of us have been, if our fathers hadn't drawed our faculties out of us?

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


Yeah. Especially with the help of a strap, rod – or something equally convincing... Sorry, just kidding around.
dave argo
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 2:17:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/10/2016
Posts: 187
Neurons: 64,498
Daemon wrote:
What would any of us have been, if our fathers hadn't drawed our faculties out of us?

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


Hopefully our fathers putted them in
and had brung them faculties to bear
then drawed them out, with fatherly care.
thar
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 2:46:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 17,130
Neurons: 69,204
From Barnaby Rudge
A historical novel set in tumultuous times in the 1780s:

Quote:
‘That chap, sir,’ said John, taking it out again after a time, and pointing at him with the stem, ‘though he’s got all his faculties about him—bottled up and corked down, if I may say so, somewheres or another—’

‘Very good!’ said Parkes, nodding his head. ‘A very good expression, Johnny. You’ll be a tackling somebody presently. You’re in twig to-night, I see.’

‘Take care,’ said Mr Willet, not at all grateful for the compliment, ‘that I don’t tackle you, sir, which I shall certainly endeavour to do, if you interrupt me when I’m making observations.— That chap, I was a saying, though he has all his faculties about him, somewheres or another, bottled up and corked down, has no more imagination than Barnaby has. And why hasn’t he?’

The three friends shook their heads at each other; saying by that action, without the trouble of opening their lips, ‘Do you observe what a philosophical mind our friend has?’

‘Why hasn’t he?’ said John, gently striking the table with his open hand. ‘Because they was never drawed out of him when he was a boy. That’s why. What would any of us have been, if our fathers hadn’t drawed our faculties out of us? What would my boy Joe have been, if I hadn’t drawed his faculties out of him?—Do you mind what I’m a saying of, gentlemen?’

‘Ah! we mind you,’ cried Parkes. ‘Go on improving of us, Johnny.’

‘Consequently, then,’ said Mr Willet, ‘that chap, whose mother was hung when he was a little boy, along with six others, for passing bad notes—and it’s a blessed thing to think how many people are hung in batches every six weeks for that, and such like offences, as showing how wide awake our government is—that chap that was then turned loose, and had to mind cows, and frighten birds away, and what not, for a few pence to live on, and so got on by degrees to mind horses, and to sleep in course of time in lofts and litter, instead of under haystacks and hedges, till at last he come to be hostler at the Maypole for his board and lodging and a annual trifle—that chap that can’t read nor write, and has never had much to do with anything but animals, and has never lived in any way but like the animals he has lived among, is a animal. And,’ said Mr Willet, arriving at his logical conclusion, ‘is to be treated accordingly.’

‘Willet,’ said Solomon Daisy, who had exhibited some impatience at the intrusion of so unworthy a subject on their more interesting theme, ‘when Mr Chester come this morning, did he order the large room?’

‘He signified, sir,’ said John, ‘that he wanted a large apartment. Yes. Certainly.’

‘Why then, I’ll tell you what,’ said Solomon, speaking softly and with an earnest look. ‘He and Mr Haredale are going to fight a duel in it.’

Everybody looked at Mr Willet, after this alarming suggestion. Mr Willet looked at the fire, weighing in his own mind the effect which such an occurrence would be likely to have on the establishment.



teachersalah
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 4:22:50 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/23/2018
Posts: 20
Neurons: 3,566
Can someone explain today's quotation to me please?
thar
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 4:39:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 17,130
Neurons: 69,204
Have you read the context? That explains it - it is rephrased with the specific example of the man they are talking about.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.