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a disaster site? Options
robjen
Posted: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 3:38:40 PM
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When a disaster, such as an earthquake and a tornado, destroys a place, some kind people go there to help others in need.


I don't think it's called a disaster site. What do you call it? Thanks a lot.
georgew
Posted: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 6:38:04 PM
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The "affected area" is one possible description.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 8:57:21 PM

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robjen wrote:
When a disaster, such as an earthquake and a tornado, destroys a place, some kind people go there to help others in need.


I don't think it's called a disaster site. What do you call it? Thanks a lot.


This, "a disaster site", is actually a good descriptive phrase for such a place. "Disaster area" is more common, according to a Google NGRAM camparison.

In the above query I also included another phrase that has become more common recently: "ground zero". This originally indicated the place immediately beneath the detonation of a bomb, but has come to mean the center of any major disaster or disruptive event.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
ChrisKC
Posted: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 10:37:36 PM

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robjen wrote:
When a disaster, such as an earthquake and a tornado, destroys a place, some kind people go there to help others in need.


I don't think it's called a disaster site. What do you call it? Thanks a lot.


I have never heard of an earthquake and a tornado at the same time as the sentence suggests. Do you mean earthquake or tornado? But certainly it is a disaster site but more commonly it is known as a "disaster area". the word "site" suggests a possible small area. A tornado 'cuts a swathe" often over a wide area and therefore "site" is inadequate to describe the affected location.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 2:07:53 AM

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Personally, I would normally use "disaster zone".

Checking the various options on the ngram viewer, it seems that the USA government prefer 'disaster area' - which affects the comparison (because the US government issue a LOT of articles, papers and "stuff" online).

The UK government and some newspapers use "disaster zone" more often.

disaster zone (in British) noun
an area or region hit by a disaster
the Soviet Republic of Turkmenistan, where, according to one report, coastal areas were last week declared a disaster zone

Collins English Dictionary.

"Disaster area" is used more figuratively - you can say that a person or subject is a disaster area.

disaster area in British noun
1. an area affected by a disaster, usually a natural disaster
The region has been declared a disaster area.
2. informal
a person or place characterized by disorder
His office was a disaster area of papers and full ashtrays.
Parts of the sport are complete disaster areas. The quality of competitions has declined.
Japan is a disaster area for investors.
Japan has been a disaster area for more than a decade for investors as the economy headed towards recession and the imprudence of bankers and borrowers was revealed.
He's a nice old rascal but a disaster area as a politician.
He's a walking disaster area.

Collins English Dictionary.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 3:41:28 AM

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It seems quite arbitrary -
You have a crash site, but a disaster zone, or the site of a disaster.
ChrisKC
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 4:54:21 AM

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Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
thar wrote:
It seems quite arbitrary -
You have a crash site, but a disaster zone, or the site of a disaster.


A lot of "common" expressions emanate from the media, somehow ignoring the "book" definitions. But of course, we are often comparing British English with Americanisms
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