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I am looking for a word related to "praise". Options
robjen
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2018 2:40:52 AM
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The word, eulogy, is a noun used to praise a person who has passed away.

If you want to write a paragraph online or in newspapers to praise a living person, what is the correct word for that?

Thanks a lot.
BobShilling
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2018 4:06:45 AM
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robjen wrote:
The word, eulogy, is a noun used to praise a person who has passed away.


Not necessarily.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2018 5:04:23 AM
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As Bob says, eulogies don't refer only to dead people. However, as we don't often to round writing praise in paragraphs of giving talks of praise on living people, I guess some people may make the connection of praise only with the dead.

Jane Goodell has been lauded and eulogised throughout her career for her work with primates; Stephen Hawking was eulogised constantly throughout his career.
TMe
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2018 6:49:38 AM

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TFD;

eulogy
noun; praise, tribute, acclaim, compliment, applause, accolade, paean, commendation, exaltation, glorification, acclamation, panegyric, encomium, plaudit, laudation He added his praise to the glowing eulogies given by her colleagues.

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

eulogynoun
An expression of warm approval:
acclaim, acclamation, applause, celebration, commendation, compliment, encomium, kudos, laudation, panegyric, plaudit, praise.

The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

I am a layman.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2018 8:58:48 AM

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glorify, honour



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
ChrisKC
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 5:26:46 AM

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"Praise" is a relatively weak word of all those that are available to us in the English language. I think its more appropriate for individual acts or a short period of 'good work or behaviour' and stated regularly. Eulogies, sometimes patronising, can be embarrassing to living people. We may praise one person many times but a eulogy ( strong word) might only occur once and more often than not is a (warm) written summary of a life that was full of achievements beneficial to humanity.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 5:58:09 AM
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My use of the word "laud" in my post was meant to illustrate a word we'd use instead of eulogised. But, of course, it's not a noun.

"Did you write that paragraph lauding Christopher Hitchens?" is an example of how we'd use it.

The only noun we'd use is "puff piece" , but that's often used when the praise is not quite sincere, so I wouldn't advise using it at all. (But at least now you know what it means if you come across it!)
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 7:19:41 AM

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Slightly off-topic, now I think it has been answered satisfactorily - my favourite is a hagiography - originally lives of the saints but metaphorically used to mean a biography of unquestioning adoration.

It always confused me - you were writing about a woman but calling them a hag! It seemed a bit disrespectful!
I knew something was wrong with my logic - only when I saw how Hagia Sofia was spelt did I suspect it might mean something else. Whistle

I still don't know how you pronounce it. It is one of those words you see written but so very rarely hear said!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 8:45:38 AM

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It's pronounced as written really (well, assuming a written 'ph' is pronounced 'f').
The "h" is aspirated, the "a" is like "cat", the "g" is hard.

It didn't used to mean "unquestioningly adoring" - it was just "holy writing" (hagia - graphy)


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 9:16:40 AM

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You can see why people are confused by English pronunciation.

My instinct says the g is hard because 'hag' is separate from '-iography'.


But purely applying g-i rules gives a soft g, if you don't separate the two parts.


And listening to how people pronounce 'Hagia Sofia' from the Greek, but now in Turkey, gives a 'ayi-'.


But there's the fun! Whistle


Listening to a podcast this morning on plants. Presenter saying how this group of plants, cycads, predate dinosaurs.

Only they said 'predate' where I would stress both parts equally - 'pre-date'. Of course I understood what she meant but it gave me a lovely image of these trees stealthily hunting and then gobbling up T-Rex!


Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 10:27:34 AM

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Ah yes - I didn't think of that.
Old Greek Gamma was hard, generally, but before iota was soft. So in Greek you'd say `æjogrəfɪ
Turkish "Y" is very soft and disappears into a diphthong with the "A"s in 'Ayasofia'.

In English, G is normally hard. But, as you say g-i is often soft.

But "hagio" just LOOKs like "hagio", not like "hajyo".

Compare:
magic (ˈmædʒɪk)
hagiography (ˌhæɡɪˈɒɡrəfɪ) n,
1. (Theology) the writing of the lives of the saints
Collins English Dictionary

I like the idea of plants being predators in the time of the dinosaurs!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 1:06:03 PM
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ThAr -

when you sAid "my favourite is hagiography" I wAs very surprised: thought you meAnt ploughing through the stuff - which is how I spent too much time in First & Second YeArs.

It's like the study of old psychiAtric notes - they got themselves cemented into churches,perched on poles, cut bits of themselves off,lived in their own ordure.Thought you were demented in wAys I'd never suspected!

But then I looked further & sAw your first reception of the word just like mine:-The study of HAGs! (Though it turned out to be how it wAs!)
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 1:53:13 PM

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Rom - I give in - I'll pay the ransom!


I've never read a hagiography - it was just one of those words that sticks in your mind. I think I first met it in its modern meaning of puff-piece, - but then these old saints also seemed to be involved somehow. With gruesome stories, as you say. It seemed an odd juxtaposition, and an odd word. And obviously about hags.

Drago - But now I think about it - I can think of all the towns in Greece or Cyprus called Agios something - Άγιος - presumably male saint "eg Ayios Georgios" - so should we really be calling it an aiography? Whistle
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, May 31, 2018 11:02:37 AM

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thar wrote:
aiography? Whistle


Wouldn't that be a secret message written in garlic juice?
Whistle


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Romany
Posted: Thursday, May 31, 2018 11:06:40 AM
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Leon -

Applause Applause

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