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until two or three years ago Options
robjen
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 2:34:00 AM
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I have written a sentence below.

(ex) He worked for his previous employer for at least five years until two or three years ago.

Is my sentence grammatically correct? Thanks a lot.
ChrisKC
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 4:57:48 AM

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I am happy with it, grammatically.
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 5:33:18 AM
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I'll admit I might be pedantic here, but I find the sentence a little clumsy.

I'd tend to say something like: "He worked for his previous employer for 5 years and left about two or three years ago."
ChrisKC
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 6:03:20 AM

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Romany wrote:
I'll admit I might be pedantic here, but I find the sentence a little clumsy.

I'd tend to say something like: "He worked for his previous employer for 5 years and left about two or three years ago."


This is the place to be pedantic! Is that why I like it so much?
papo_308
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 6:58:59 AM
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Would the use of the past perfect continuous tense be an overkill?

He had been working for his previous employer for at least five years until two or three years ago.
thar
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 7:02:58 AM

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robjen wrote:
I have written a sentence below.

(ex) He worked for his previous employer for at least five years until two or three years ago.

Is my sentence grammatically correct? Thanks a lot.



You need punctuation, to break up your separate adverbs of time.
thar
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 7:08:11 AM

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papo_308 wrote:
Would the use of the past perfect continuous tense be an overkill?

He had been working for his previous employer for at least five years until two or three years ago.



That really only applies if something happened then.

At the moment it is just an end point -until x, for an event in the past - simple past.


For the past perfect to be needed, you need to be looking back from that point two to three years ago - it has to be an event itself - maybe the start of something, something you are looking back from.

He had worked there for five years when two to three years ago he was suddenly sacked.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 7:33:09 AM

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I'd say that 'grammatically' your original is OK.

However its 'style' needs some work. This includes choice of phrases, punctuation and so on. It does sound a little clumsy.
(I've had 68 years to perfect my style - and it is far from perfect!)

The only advice I can really give here as a simple statement is - if you have two similar adverbial phrases, keep them separate.

Here you have two adverbial phrases of time - "for at least five years" and "until two or three years ago".
One gives the period from the beginning of the action to the end, and the other gives the period from the end of the action to present time.

Possibly a dash is enough:
He worked for his previous employer for at least five years — until two or three years ago.

You may want to make them parts of separate clauses (which means re-wording the last part):
He worked for his previous employer for at least five years , but left two or three years ago.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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