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Should I also underlined "ago" in order to get the question? Options
DavidLearn
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:22:06 AM

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Hi teachers,
According to the underlined part, I believe the question is the one I've written. My question is about "ago" in the answer, should I also underlined it in order to get the question or not?

How long ago did he escape from prison?
Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison.

Thanks.
ChrisKC
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 10:10:47 AM

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If the question and answer is part of the same narrative then I think the question remains the same.
The answer is "twenty-four hours ago" - I think no need to do any underlining and no need to add, 'he escaped from prison'
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 11:02:17 AM

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The question of time goes first in the question. The question word goes first:


How long ago did....?


But the answer would either give the sim!e answer:
24 hours ago.


Or, the adverbial phrase of time would be in its natural p!ace at the end of a full answer:
He escaped twenty-four hours ago.



The only reason for putting it at the beginning would be setting the scene for a series of events. But not in answer to your question.

What happened? When?
Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison. Then he boarded a plane and flew to Sweden. After that he disappeared. Yesterday he was sighted in Norway.

It does not answer the question 'how long ago did he escape?'
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 11:56:28 AM

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The usual answer would be "It was twenty-four hours ago."

"Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison" is not how anybody would answer the question as presented. It might be the answer to some other question:

  "Why are we talking about him?"
  "Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison."


TMe
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 12:37:16 PM

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Twenty-fours ago.
Nobody will say this.
Everybody will say

"Yesterday he escaped from prison".

Length of time changes every second. None can be so exact so as to say "Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison".
And then "Twenty-four hours and five-minutes ago he escaped from prison",
And then twenty-four hours and thirty minutes ago he escaped from prison.
Practically, logically and grammatically the expression change. IMO

I am a layman.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 2:29:36 PM

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It depends on what you need to express.

'Yesterday' gives the date, but not the length of time he has been free. It is very vague! (And could be only a couple of hours ago).


24 hours may be the most useful information you can give - it means he has had 24 hours (+/- 1 or 2) to travel a distance, contact people, commit crimes. And it tells you what time it happened, if you are listening live, so you can come forward if you saw something.

It all depends on what information is useful in the context.
DavidLearn
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 4:13:48 PM

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Location: Girona, Catalonia, Spain
Hi everyone,
Thank you all for your help and comments.
It's a listening exercise, so I can't change anything about that.

This is the paragraph where I took the sentence from.
The inspector waited, and the Chief of Police looked at him coldly. ‘What are you waiting for?’ she asked. ‘Go out and find him! Three months ago this man – Alex Dinon – killed the President of our country. He’s a murderer – a dangerous man. Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison, and our new President wants him back in prison–today! Now! At once!’

I believe this one is correct:
How long ago did he escape from prison?
a) (He escaped from prison) twenty-four hours ago.
b) It was twenty-four hours ago.

David.
DavidLearn
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 4:22:01 PM

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Joined: 1/27/2014
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Location: Girona, Catalonia, Spain
NKM wrote:
The usual answer would be "It was twenty-four hours ago."

"Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison" is not how anybody would answer the question as presented. It might be the answer to some other question:

  "Why are we talking about him?"
  "Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison."




Hi NKM,
What does the "It" substitute or is it the dummy subject?

David.
Audiendus
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 7:02:14 PM
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DavidLearn wrote:
What does the "It" substitute or is it the dummy subject?

Dummy subject. (It was twenty-four hours ago that he escaped from prison.)
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 11:59:24 PM

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Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 763
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Twenty-fours ago.
Nobody will say this.
Everybody will say

"Yesterday he escaped from prison".

Length of time changes every second. None can be so exact so as to say "Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison".
And then "Twenty-four hours and five-minutes ago he escaped from prison",
And then twenty-four hours and thirty minutes ago he escaped from prison.
Practically, logically and grammatically the expression change. IMO

I am a layman.
palapaguy
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 12:55:26 AM

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Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 1,084
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
TMe wrote:
Twenty-fours ago. [sic]
Nobody will say this.
Everybody will say

"Yesterday he escaped from prison". IMO


No. In AE "twenty-four hours ago" is commonly used as a synonym for "yesterday." Some will say this.

And "nobody" and "everybody" are both incorrect.
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