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Idioms of the Day Options
ChrisKC
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 5:50:32 AM

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Yesterday's Idiom of the day was (as) "nice as ninepence". But I seem to remember in England, at least: "as right as ninepence". Did I remember correctly?

And the Idiom of the day before yesterday was "a night out". Can this be justified as as an idiom? Isn't this a quite an ordinary thing to say and not have anything significant about it that requires explanation?
towan52
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:02:38 AM

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I agree - never heard "nice as ninepence" until now - it was always "right". "Nice" sounds like a nine-bob note!

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
mactoria
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 2:24:23 AM
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I also agree that "a night out" doesn't really qualify as an idiom, at least in American English, as it's such a common and obvious way of saying what is intended. The definition of idiom includes that it's a peculiar way of saying something that isn't obvious, and so I've found several of the 'idioms of the day' really don't qualify as idioms, they're just how things are said and understood. But guess someone things otherwise....
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 6:29:14 AM

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I have never heard 'nice as ninepence' or 'right as ninepence' - but, as the popular period for 'right as ninepence' was between 1885 and 1925, that is understandable.

"Nice as ninepence" has never had a popular period except for a brief 'flurry' around 1861. Here's the graph.

**********************
I suppose . . . really - if one were a foreigner who had learned standard English at school (for example) it is idiomatic.

A night out could be from 7pm to 11pm.
Right now, here, 'night' is from about 10:30pm to 4:00am.

A night out could be spent in - in the pub, in the theatre, in the cinema, etc.

So, 'night' doesn't mean 'night' and 'out' means 'in'.

Definitely idiomatic. It's an ordinary thing to say, but the phrase doesn't add up to the two words separately.
A literal 'night out' would be sitting on a park bench from 10pm to 5am.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ursus Minor
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 6:54:20 AM

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Right as rain is very common.'As right as my right ball' is less frequent(as an example of irony).
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 9:10:49 AM

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"Right as rain" I know - that's the common one, I think.

I've never heard to other . . .

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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