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Is this question natural? Options
DavidLearn
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 5:56:42 AM

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Hi teachers,
Is this question natural?

How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and came back to Barcelona?

Thanks.
ashscot50
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:39:57 AM

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Location: Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes.

Edit

Apologies, agreed, "came" should be "come"; but otherwise I see nothing wrong with the sentence, albeit, it's perhaps "Spanish English".

Equally, "get back to" is "American English".
towan52
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:40:32 AM

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No, it doesn't work as it is. Also "came" should be "come". It is understandable, but not natural. Most people would say something like. "When did you get back to Barcelona after the Easter break?"

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
pjharvey
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:41:05 AM
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From a grammar point of view it should be "How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and come back to Barcelona?" ("come" as an infinitive, just like "finish").
However, I don't think it sounds natural for a native speaker.
I'd say something like "When did you come back to Barcelona from your Easter holidays?".

Ooops, just realized we posted at the same time, towan - and it seems we perfectly agree!
towan52
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:57:16 AM

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pjharvey wrote:
From a grammar point of view it should be "How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and come back to Barcelona?" ("come" as an infinitive, just like "finish").
However, I don't think it sounds natural for a native speaker.
I'd say something like "When did you come back to Barcelona from your Easter holidays?".

Ooops, just realized we posted at the same time, towan - and it seems we perfectly agree!


They say that, "Great minds think alike" but they also say that, "Fools seldom differ". Whistle

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
pjharvey
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:58:22 AM
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towan52 wrote:
pjharvey wrote:
From a grammar point of view it should be "How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and come back to Barcelona?" ("come" as an infinitive, just like "finish").
However, I don't think it sounds natural for a native speaker.
I'd say something like "When did you come back to Barcelona from your Easter holidays?".

Ooops, just realized we posted at the same time, towan - and it seems we perfectly agree!


They say that, "Great minds think alike" but they also say that, "Fools seldom differ". Whistle


Right, ah ah ah Dancing
DavidLearn
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:29:05 AM

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Location: Girona, Catalonia, Spain
Thank you all for your help and comments. Angel

David.
ashscot50
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:40:59 AM

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Location: Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
DavidLearn wrote:
Thank you all for your help and comments. Angel

David.


De nada.
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 1:47:48 PM

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DavidLearn wrote:
Teachers,
Is this question natural?
How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and came back to Barcelona?


Hi DavidLearn,

Firstly,
'Easter holiday' should be singular, (not holidays) for a holiday can be a few days in different places but still considered a holiday. If we speak of different or even same location at a different time, then it would be plural. For eg., "How long ago did you finish your Easter and Passover holidays and return to Barcelona."

In the case of just Easter, it could be a whole week...from Palm Sunday through the day after Easter Sunday, as in the USA's Bd. of Ed schools, which here we call Easter or Spring Break.

Secondly, It's necessary to know where the one inquiring is, geographically:

How long ago did you finish your Easter holiday and come back to Barcelona?
In this instance, the inquirer is in Barcelona.

How long ago did you finish your Easter holiday and return to Barcelona?, which is similar to the original question.
Or
When did you get back to Barcelona after your Easter Break?, as towan52 suggests.
In these instances, the inquirer is not necessarily in Barcelona.

It's the same definition in Spanish/English and American/ English.





"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
DavidLearn
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 2:11:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/27/2014
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Location: Girona, Catalonia, Spain
hedy mmm wrote:
DavidLearn wrote:
Teachers,
Is this question natural?
How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and came back to Barcelona?


Hi DavidLearn,

Firstly,
'Easter holiday' should be singular, (not holidays) for a holiday can be a few days in different places but still considered a holiday. If we speak of different or even same location at a different time, then it would be plural. For eg., "How long ago did you finish your Easter and Passover holidays and return to Barcelona."

In the case of just Easter, it could be a whole week...from Palm Sunday through the day after Easter Sunday, as in the USA's Bd. of Ed schools, which here we call Easter or Spring Break.

Secondly, It's necessary to know where the one inquiring is, geographically:

How long ago did you finish your Easter holiday and come back to Barcelona?
In this instance, the inquirer is in Barcelona.

How long ago did you finish your Easter holiday and return to Barcelona?, which is similar to the original question.
Or
When did you get back to Barcelona after your Easter Break?, as towan52 suggests.
In these instances, the inquirer is not necessarily in Barcelona.

It's the same definition in Spanish/English and American/ English.


Hi hedy mmm,
Thanks for your reply and explanations. I thought that the only time we can use "holidays" in plural, was for Christmas Holidays and Easter holidays.

In American English, holidays covers more than one day, and is implicit in the conversation as relating to Easter Holidays, Christmas Holidays, etc. Right?

David.
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 11:20:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2014
Posts: 1,048
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Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Hi DavidLearn,
Your new question made me search further...so I researched, in case I was mistaken in my response.
Believe it or not, I found a TFD post by thar from June 28, 2011...although he's using the 'vacation' vs 'vacations', I thought it would apply.

thar wrote:
vacation can take a plural vacations
"the summer vacation is over, now it is autumn and I am going back to school."
"the summer vacations are over, now I have a job and have to work every summer."


I guess, other than correcting the other grammar comments, the singular or plural form are up for grabs...
I'll stick to: "How long ago did you finish your Easter holiday and return to Barcelona"

Great question...hope this was helpful.
hedy


"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
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