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Jigneshbharati
Posted: Friday, May 11, 2018 12:40:31 PM
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"Delhi were struggling having lost a few wickets, he was involved in a couple of runouts and to come out and play like that for a young player was remarkable," he hailed.
Pant is the future, says Ganguly
Is "having lost a few wickets" a participial phrase acting as an adverb as it answers the "why question"?
Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 7:57:53 AM
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Jigneshbharati wrote:
"Delhi were struggling having lost a few wickets, he was involved in a couple of runouts and to come out and play like that for a young player was remarkable," he hailed.
Pant is the future, says Ganguly
Is "having lost a few wickets" a participial phrase acting as an adverb as it answers the "why question"?

Yes, that is one way of looking at it. It states why, or in what way, Delhi were struggling.

Alternatively, it could be regarded as a participial phrase acting as an adjective describing the state that Delhi were in. It would then be equivalent to "Delhi, having lost a few wickets, were struggling".

I think either analysis is justifiable.

(There should be commas after "struggling" and "runouts".)
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 12:19:52 PM
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Thanks
Islami
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 12:27:57 PM
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Audi wrote;

Jigneshbharati wrote:
"Delhi were struggling having lost a few wickets, he was involved in a couple of runouts and to come out and play like that for a young player was remarkable," he hailed.
Pant is the future, says Ganguly
Is "having lost a few wickets" a participial phrase acting as an adverb as it answers the "why question"?

Yes, that is one way of looking at it. It states why, or in what way, Delhi were struggling.

Alternatively, it could be regarded as a participial phrase acting as an adjective describing the state that Delhi were in. It would then be equivalent to "Delhi, having lost a few wickets, were struggling".

I think either analysis is justifiable.

Audiendus
Should there be 'after' before ' having lost a few wickets', in the above sentence?



Just because the writer of an article is British doesn't mean that they use English correctly-DragOnspeaker.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 12:44:53 PM
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Having had your question answered, are you happy with the sentence?

Because it's definitely a bit dodgy!(Not quite right) taken as a whole.






























Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 12:54:57 PM

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I am not a grammar expert, but still(I am subject to correction) I feel, the sentence needs some correction;

"Dare Devils Delhi were struggling after having lost a few wickets. He was involved in a couple of run-outs and to come out and play like that for a young player was remarkable," he hailed.
Pant is the future, says Ganguly
Is "having lost a few wickets" a participial phrase acting as an adverb as it answers the "why question"?


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:31:07 PM

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I think maybe Ashwin is a little biased in Delhi's favour . . .
Could it be that he's a supporter?

However, as Romany says the original sentence is 'a bit dodgy'.

The "after" is a good change - it could be a comma too - but it should not be "Delhi were struggling having lost a few wickets."
That does not read well.

Delhi were struggling after having lost a few wickets.
Delhi were struggling, having lost a few wickets.


I prefer 'run-outs' to 'runouts'.

The "he" is 'hanging' - it is a pronoun with no defining noun until the next paragraph. Grammatically, it appears to mean "Delhi". Definitely strange. Anxious


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 2:06:53 PM

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The first 'he' must be Pant ('he was involved in a couple of run-outs' - as a keeper? It really needs a 'but' there.)

I think they were struggling, then he played well by getting two run-outs. Although that is his job! And they take risks in the quick game.



And the speaking 'he' is Ganguly.
Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 8:17:49 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Delhi were struggling after having lost a few wickets.
Delhi were struggling, having lost a few wickets.

I don't really like "after having". I know it is used, but it seems a bit tautological to me. I prefer "after losing a few wickets".

With regard to the OP, the addition of "after" (either "after having lost" or "after losing") would, of course, make the phrase definitely adverbial.
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