The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, May 1, 2018 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 24,010
Neurons: 71,208
Location: Inside Farlex computers
There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.

Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870)
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, May 1, 2018 2:54:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 3,360
Neurons: 2,368,552
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Quotation of the Day

There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.

Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870)
Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, May 1, 2018 12:16:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 2,423
Neurons: 166,681
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.

Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870)


There is neither happiness nor misery in the world. We have to create it and if this creation for some reason doesn't fit us – have to confound it by our own efforts...
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, May 1, 2018 12:25:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 6,274
Neurons: 4,171,804
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia


Context from :The Count of Monte Cristo

Chapter 117
The Fifth of October


The next morning at daybreak, Valentine and Morrel were walking arm–in–arm on the sea–shore, Valentine relating how Monte Cristo had appeared in her room, explained everything, revealed the crime, and, finally, how he had saved her life by enabling her to simulate death. They had found the door of the grotto opened, and gone forth; on the azure dome of heaven still glittered a few remaining stars. Morrel soon perceived a man standing among the rocks, apparently awaiting a sign from them to advance, and pointed him out to Valentine. “Ah, it is Jacopo,” she said, “the captain of the yacht;” and she beckoned him towards them.

“Do you wish to speak to us?” asked Morrel.

“I have a letter to give you from the count.”

“From the count!” murmured the two young people.

“Yes; read it.” Morrel opened the letter, and read:—

“My Dear Maximilian,—

“There is a felucca for you at anchor. Jacopo will carry you to Leghorn, where Monsieur Noirtier awaits his granddaughter, whom he wishes to bless before you lead her to the altar. All that is in this grotto, my friend, my house in the Champs Elysees, and my chateau at Treport, are the marriage gifts bestowed by Edmond Dantes upon the son of his old master, Morrel. Mademoiselle de Villefort will share them with you; for I entreat her to give to the poor the immense fortune reverting to her from her father, now a madman, and her brother who died last September with his mother. Tell the angel who will watch over your future destiny, Morrel, to pray sometimes for a man, who like Satan thought himself for an instant equal to God, but who now acknowledges with Christian humility that God alone possesses supreme power and infinite wisdom. Perhaps those prayers may soften the remorse he feels in his heart. As for you, Morrel, this is the secret of my conduct towards you. There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness. We must have felt what it is to die, Morrel, that we may appreciate the enjoyments of living.

“Live, then, and be happy, beloved children of my heart, and never forget that until the day when God shall deign to reveal the future to man, all human wisdom is summed up in these two words,—’Wait and hope.’ Your friend,

“Edmond Dantes, Count of Monte Cristo.”


Read more :http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/180/the-count-of-monte-cristo/3390/chapter-117-the-fifth-of-october/


Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.