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have more than one string to (one's) bow Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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have more than one string to (one's) bow

To have multiple viable options or alternatives available in the event that the current course of action, circumstance, opportunity, etc., does not work out. More...

Emel Rapchan
Posted: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 12:06:16 PM

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have more than one string to (one's) bow

- They are thoughtful guys having more than one string to their bow and cultivating a number of options in their career.
- Having more than one string to your bow, you can be more suitable for being employed for any kind of company.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 5:25:51 PM

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Two strings to one’s bow.
More than one way of reaching one’s goal. This term comes from the custom of archers carrying a reserve string. It first appeared in English in the mid-fifteenth century, and by 1546 it was in John Heywood’s proverb collection. In the nineteenth century a number of novelists, including Jane Austen and Anthony Trollope, used the term as a metaphor for lovers: if one love affair fails, there is always another lover to be had. The current cliché is used more generally to mean resources in reserve.

I wonder, though, whether, both Ayto and Ammer may have missed something of the early sense of having two strings to one bow. Here is the occurrence in John Heywood, Proverbes (1546):



Yee have many strings to your bowe, for yee know,

Though I, having the bent of your uncles bow,

Can no way bring your bolt in the butte to stand ;

Yet have yee other markes to rove at hand.



https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/3118/what-is-the-origin-of-the-phrase-another-string-to-your-bow
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