The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Clinic and Surgery Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 5:39:12 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 3,374
Neurons: 13,768
Where I live, the words, for example, "Bishan Clinic and Surgery" is found displayed at the front of the "shop".

What I don't understand is why "Clinic" and "Surgery" are used together. Aren't the words synonymous?

Thanks.
palapaguy
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 11:24:25 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 822
Neurons: 9,134
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
No, at least in AE. "Clinic" means a common "storefront" medical practice where doctors consult and treat walk-in patients. "Surgery" means serious medical operations conducted in hospital settings.
Koh Elaine
Posted: Sunday, April 15, 2018 1:47:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 3,374
Neurons: 13,768
Thanks, palapaguy.

The doctors who display the signs I mentioned earlier are family physicians. As they perform only minor surgeries, the use of "surgery" baffles me. Are they using "surgery" wrongly?

The following definition is from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary.

surgery
surgery (ADVICE) /ˈsɜː.dʒər.i/ US /ˈsɝː.dʒɚ-/
noun UK
1 [C or U] a place where you can go to ask advice from or receive treatment from a doctor or dentist:
If you come to the surgery (US office) at 10.30, the doctor will see you then.
On Saturday mornings, surgery (= the fixed period of opening of the place where you can go to see your doctor) is (US office hours are) from 9.00 to 12.00.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, April 15, 2018 2:43:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 893
Neurons: 5,679
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
In British English the place where a GP has consultations with patients may be called a surgery, that's not the case in AmE.

"Clinic and Surgery" is a tautology as far as I am concerned.


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
TMe
Posted: Sunday, April 15, 2018 11:05:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 594
Neurons: 3,762
In India the degree granted to a doctor is M.B.,B.S. which stands for Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery. An M,B.,B.S. is entitled to practice is competent to practice medicine and perform minor surgeries. Hence "Clinic and Surgery".

Normally written as "Physician and Surgeon".IMO

I am a layman.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 7:10:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,459
Neurons: 162,136
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
The way I know these two words - as they are used in general conversation mostly - are:

clinic n
1. (Medicine) a place in which outpatients are given medical treatment or advice


When I was young, and when my children were young, the town or village 'National Health Clinic' was staffed by nurses, paramedic auxiliaries and so on (doctors may visit there sometimes for special days).
It is where you would go to get an inoculation/vaccination, or get a bad cut cleaned up (we normally did our own first-aid, anything less than stitches), or children's routine eye-tests, and things like that.

A surgery was where you met the doctor.

surgery n, pl -geries
3. (Medicine) Brit a place where a doctor, dentist, etc, can be consulted


My doctor had his surgery in the back, ground-floor room of his house.
The front room was his waiting-room with his wife acting as receptionist and secretary at a desk in one corner.
They lived on the upper two floors of the house.
We called the room where we saw him "the surgery" or we called the whole house "the surgery".

***********
If I saw a sign saying "Clinic and Surgery", I would expect it to have at least one doctor's surgery (room in which the doctor practised).
There would also be a section where routine work or emergency treatment not needing a doctor would be done - the clinic.

****************
Both words have other definitions, but these would not really apply to a sign outside a local "shop".

A hospital may heave an eye-clinic, an ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) clinic, etc. Sections where a specific branch of medicine is practised.
An operating theatre is occasionally called a surgery (but very rarely).

A Member of Parliament or other official may have a 'surgery' or sometimes 'clinic' - a specified time and place in which public people could go and discuss things.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 10:42:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,309
Neurons: 69,927
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
TFD defines 'surgery' this way also;

sur·ger·y (sûr′jə-rē)
n. pl. sur·ger·ies
1. The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of injury, deformity, and disease by the use of instruments.
2.
a. Treatment based on such medicine, typically involving the removal or replacement of diseased tissue by cutting: The athlete had surgery on his knee.
b. A procedure that is part of this treatment; an operation: The doctor performed three surgeries this morning.



clin·ic (klĭn′ĭk)
n.
1. A facility, often associated with a hospital or medical school, that is devoted to the diagnosis and care of outpatients.
2. A medical establishment run by several specialists working in cooperation and sharing the same facilities.
3. A group session offering counsel or instruction in a particular field or activity: a vocational clinic; a tennis clinic.
4.
a. A seminar or meeting of physicians and medical students in which medical instruction is conducted in the presence of the patient, as at the bedside.
b. A place where such instruction occurs.
c. A class or lecture of medical instruction conducted in this manner.
[French clinique, from Greek klīnikē (tekhnē), clinical (method), feminine of klīnikos, from klīnē, couch, bed; see clinandrium.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
clinic (ˈklɪnɪk)
n
1. (Medicine) a place in which outpatients are given medical treatment or advice, often connected to a hospital
2. (Medicine) a similar place staffed by physicians or surgeons specializing in one or more specific areas: eye clinic.
3. (Medicine) Brit a private hospital or nursing home
4. (Medicine) obsolete the teaching of medicine to students at the bedside
5. (Medicine) US a place in which medical lectures are given



P.S. Do we adopt definitions which suit us?

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
BobShilling
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 11:15:42 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 86
Neurons: 1,302
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The way I know these two words - as they are used in general conversation mostly - are:...


The ways you mention how I have always used the words
.

Quote:

If I saw a sign saying "Clinic and Surgery", I would expect it to have at least one doctor's surgery (room in which the doctor practised).
There would also be a section where routine work or emergency treatment not needing a doctor would be done - the clinic.


I would expect the same.

Perhaps our similar views on this have something to do with us both being septuagenarian speakers of BrE.
Islami
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 12:06:07 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 7/21/2017
Posts: 60
Neurons: 298
There is an idiom :

To call a spade, a spade.

Do you know of it?

Just because the writer of an article is British doesn't mean that they use English correctly-DragOnspeaker.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 1:34:10 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,459
Neurons: 162,136
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ashwin Joshi wrote:
P.S. Do we adopt definitions which suit us?

In my experience, we adopt definitions which we hear often, and with which we grow up

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
BobShilling
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 2:37:15 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 86
Neurons: 1,302
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Islami wrote:
To call a spade, a spade.

Do you know of it?


That's question for another thread. This one is about clinic and surgery.
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 11:08:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 594
Neurons: 3,762
BobShilling wrote;That's question for another thread. This one is about clinic and surgery.

Islami wrote:
To call a spade, a spade.

Do you know of it?

Here it means one should not twist the meaning of any word. The one in vogue should be adopted.

I am a layman.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.