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A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)
Jim Cape
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 3:03:30 AM

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Truly timeless and very well put. Applause
Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 3:11:57 AM
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Daemon wrote:
A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


Yeah. If man itself falls short of obligations what can be asked from the Miss Universe?
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 3:39:25 AM

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Quotation of the Day

A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)
zina antoaneta
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 7:56:25 AM

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The words of a man to whom the universe did not show much kindness.
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 8:45:35 PM

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For the Universe, if it is alive, we are but a speckle riding a dust in the middle of a spread star-dust rounding a small puddle of light!
I strongly believe that providing that the universe has any kind of consciousness, we couldn't be noticed by it in any possible level.
Alisson Souza
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:16:57 PM

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Quotation of the Day

A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


I have been thinking as a man that he still finds understanding myself with a groggy awareness. Alisson Souza - 2018
AndySon
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 4:12:13 AM

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Quotation of the Day

A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


I took this quote slightly differently. "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation." refers to the fact that existence solely is not sufficient. There must be added to it something else (work, creation, ambition etc)


Would anyone try to argue? :D
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 4:25:07 AM

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Quotation of the Day

A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)
ibj_ldn
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 10:16:49 AM

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Simply put, we are on our own... but God guides us all!
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 11:46:49 AM

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A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."
Stephen Crane (1871-1900)

- I agree. We are protagonist only in our own n lives. The universe doesn't give a shit on us.
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 12:17:39 PM
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Daemon wrote:
A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


Yeah. That alone makes the whole party game so interesting and exciting...
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 2:25:24 PM

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This is the Poem XXI
from:War is Kindand Other Lines
by Stephen Crane
(1899)


{Comment}

War, violence, shooting, death. War, violence, shooting, death. Repeat.

Crane's experiences on the front lines in Greece (1897) and later in Cuba (1898) inspired both another war novella (Active Service, published in 1899,) and the famous poem "War Is Kind," which was also published in 1899 in a volume entitled War Is Kind and Other Lines.

As you may have guessed, "War Is Kind" isn't about how war is kind, but the exact opposite: how war is just about the rudest, most awful thing ever. The poem offers a disturbing and scathing critique of war, the patriotism that inspires it, and the people who conduct it. All war does is cause death and destruction: maidens lose their loves, babies their fathers, mothers their sons. And according to Crane, the whole cruel industry is the way it is because military leaders (like the guy who speaks the second and fourth stanzas) see their soldiers as dehumanized cogs in a giant killing machine, "born" only "to drill and die."

"War Is Kind" is about a different, but just as insensitive, group of people. The odd-numbered stanzas show the speaker talking to a maiden, a babe, and a mother, and telling them that important men in their lives have died. And guess what? The speaker sounds just like whoever writes those cold rejection form letters. All he does is talk about what happened to the men, and then reiterate some clichés about how war is kind and they shouldn't be upset. Yeah, just like you shouldn't be upset about getting rejected from Stanford. Sure, dude.

Elsewhere in the poem, it's the same thing. When he talks about his soldiers, he all but says they're there to die and that's it ("born to drill and die," 8). He doesn't care about them, just like he doesn't seem to care about the people he talks to in stanzas 1, 3, and 5. The difference is, when it comes to the soldiers he's not just being a jerk but actually sending them to their deaths, and not always for the most explainable of reasons.

The poem's most powerful argument, then, is that being sensitive matters. A lot. Seeing people as people—and not just as idiots born to die or expected to believe that war is kind—is an important step towards making sure wars don't happen, and making sure that those who wage wars see their soldiers and their families as real people with real feelings and real lives.


https://www.shmoop.com/war-is-kind/analysis.htm

dave argo
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 3:35:34 PM

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Daemon wrote:
A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


It has been claimed that WAR is Glory,
and it is still glorified today.
Calling it Kind to emphasize the folly,
was as ironic then, as that may.
Yet a hundred years later we are wholly
itching, to be back in the fray.

But if A man said to the universe:
"Sir, I exist"
The universe may say "At your peril
you persist!"



"War is Kind"
Stanza 1


Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind.
Because your lover threw wild hands toward the sky
And the affrighted steed ran on alone,
Do not weep.
War is kind.


Hoarse, booming drums of the regiment,
Little souls who thirst for fight,
These men were born to drill and die.
The unexplained glory flies above them,
Great is the battle-god, great, and his kingdom --
A field where a thousand corpses lie.

Do not weep, babe, for war is kind.
Because your father tumbled in the yellow trenches,
Raged at his breast, gulped and died,
Do not weep.
War is kind.


Swift blazing flag of the regiment,
Eagle with crest of red and gold,
These men were born to drill and die.
Point for them the virtue of slaughter,
Make plain to them the excellence of killing
And a field where a thousand corpses lie.

Mother whose heart hung humble as a button
On the bright splendid shroud of your son,
Do not weep.
War is kind.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, June 14, 2018 11:52:11 PM

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AndySon wrote:
Quotation of the Day

A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation."

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


I took this quote slightly differently. "That fact has not created in me a sense of obligation." refers to the fact that existence solely is not sufficient. There must be added to it something else (work, creation, ambition etc)


Would anyone try to argue? :D


You should start a new topic in the Philosophy and Religion Section to explore this idea.

Briefly, however, the fact you exist isn't of sufficient value in your mind? It is only what you produce, create, or desire to create (ambition) that has value?

I'm also struck by the "shmoop analysis" that seeing people as people will somehow make sure wars don't happen, because sometimes that is exactly why wars happen. When some selfish ass marches into your area and slaughters those you see as people, seeing the killers as people doesn't generate peaceful feelings towards them; not to mention the fact that everything that lives kills something else in order to continue living. There is no getting around it.

The poem's most powerful argument, then, is that being sensitive matters. A lot. Seeing people as people—and not just as idiots born to die or expected to believe that war is kind—is an important step towards making sure wars don't happen, and making sure that those who wage wars see their soldiers and their families as real people with real feelings and real lives.


https://www.shmoop.com/war-is-kind/analysis.htm



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
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