The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

What's wrong with the verb forms? Options
robjen
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 4:32:33 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/17/2015
Posts: 591
Neurons: 3,302
(ex) John is going shopping for a while and plans to visit his uncle after that.

Some of my non-native English speaking friends think there is a problem with the verb forms. They say "planning" should be used.

I think they are wrong. What do you think? Thank you for your help.
Gabriel82
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 5:26:21 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 7/22/2017
Posts: 97
Neurons: 251,584
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas, United States
robjen wrote:
(ex) John is going shopping for a while and plans to visit his uncle after that.

Some of my non-native English speaking friends think there is a problem with the verb forms. They say "planning" should be used.

I think they are wrong. What do you think? Thank you for your help.


Yes. Ideally you should employ the same type of verb for consistency.

It could be ¨John went shopping for a while and visited his uncle after that.¨

You would use this in the case of reported speech--shift the tense one step back into the past.

or

¨John is going shopping for a while and is planning to visit his uncle after that.¨

The last one is better if youŕe talking about plans John has to do this in the near future or even that same day.
mirilli
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 5:38:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/28/2013
Posts: 199
Neurons: 1,293,505
Location: Gubbio, Umbria, Italy
[quote=robjen](ex) John is going shopping for a while and plans to visit his uncle after that.

Some of my non-native English speaking friends think there is a problem with the verb forms. They say "planning" should be used.


The Simple Present is used to express habits, general truths, repeated actions or unchanging situations, emotions and wishes. This is not the case.Shame on you
Audiendus
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 9:14:34 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 5,190
Neurons: 950,903
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
robjen wrote:
(ex) John is going shopping for a while and plans to visit his uncle after that.

Some of my non-native English speaking friends think there is a problem with the verb forms. They say "planning" should be used.

I think they are wrong. What do you think? Thank you for your help.


I think "plans" and "planning" are both acceptable. If I used "plans", I would put a comma after "while" to suggest a slight pause.

Compare the following:

"John is going shopping for a while, and intends to visit his uncle after that."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 10:20:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,670
Neurons: 182,147
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
mirilli wrote:
The Simple Present is used to express habits, general truths, repeated actions or unchanging situations, emotions and wishes.

This is just a few of the things which that verb-form can be used for.

It is also used to show the future, the past . . .
It depends on the verb used, and on the rest of the sentence.

The phrase "He plans to ______" is one normal way to express it. "He is planning to _____" is another way.
Both are correct.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
BobShilling
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 11:48:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 545
Neurons: 3,706
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Gabriel82 wrote:
Ideally you should employ the same type of verb for consistency.


I don't agree. The tense/aspect we choose to use depends on the message we wish to convey. Any mix is possible if appropriate to the sense. I agree with Audiendus and Drag0.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.