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D00M
Posted: Saturday, April 7, 2018 4:45:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,607
Neurons: 7,645
Hello respected teachers,

I wish she had never come here.

I wish she never came here.

Are both the above correct please?

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
D00M
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 8:19:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,607
Neurons: 7,645
Any help please? Think

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 3:06:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,685
Neurons: 182,345
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello D00M!
Gosh, this question has been neglected, hasn't it?

"Wish" can be used with clauses in most tenses except any future form. (Some are very unusual, and are just not used, but you could say that they are not 'grammatically incorrect'.)

The form shifts when you change a fact into a wish. I don't know a rule, but when I make up my own examples, it seems like a shift to past form . . .
However sometimes, I naturally change the verb rather than the tense - but I think that is only for the specific verb "come". "go" and "be" - which are often 'swapped around' depending on the speaker's attitude.

She comes here. (a repeated occasional or habitual action)
I wish she never came here or I wish she didn't come here. (a past form of the verb)

She came here. (a single past action)
I wish she had never come here. (this uses the "double past" form - the pluperfect or past perfect)

(some more)
She used to come here. (a repeated, habitual past action) - this has two possible 'wishes', which have the same physical meaning, really.
I wish she had never come here. (again, the 'double past' - The speaker is concerned about her travel - the 'coming'.)
I wish she had never been here. (again the 'double past' - In this case, the speaker is more concerned with her presence after the 'trip' - the 'being here'.)

Hope that helps.




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
BobShilling
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 12:12:09 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 545
Neurons: 3,706
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
[quote=Drag0nspeaker I don't know a rule, but when I make up my own examples, it seems like a shift to past form . . .[/quote]

It is. Backshifting (present to past/ present perfect/past to past perfect (double past)) is standard in English to indicate hypothetical/irrealis situations:

If they come tomorrow, we can discuss the new project. (a real possibility)
If they come tomorrow, we could discuss the new project. (a less real or unreal possibility)
If they were here now, we could discuss the new project. (unreal - they are not here)
If they had been here yesterday, we could have discussed the new project. (unreal - they were not here. the 'past of time' is 'doubled-pasted' for irrealis.)

I hope they are happy. (real possibility)
I wish they were happy. (unreal - they are not happy)


I hope they were happy. (real possibility)
I wish they had been happy. (unreal - they were not happy)

John will interrupt when I am talking. I wish he wouldn't (unreal)

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