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make the welkin ring Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, March 23, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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make the welkin ring

To make a very loud, reverberating sound or noise. ("Welkin" is an archaic or literary word for the skies or the heavens, only used in contemporary English as a part of this phrase.) More...

KSPavan
Posted: Friday, March 23, 2018 3:01:51 AM

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Idiom of the Day
make the welkin ring — To make a very loud, reverberating sound or noise. ("Welkin" is an archaic or literary word for the skies or the heavens, only used in contemporary English as a part of this phrase.)
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Friday, March 23, 2018 11:23:14 AM

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make the welkin ring
- My father used to broke into our bedroom armed with a pan with scrambled eggs and bacon making the welkin ring calling for the breakfast.
- She was barking at the board as the committee was voting in an explicit demonstration of disgust towards that monstrosity. Her voice made the welkin ring and disrupt the meeting.

Welkin - Special Note
- The apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projected
- This word was a inherit word came from Frisian Language and incorporated into Old English
- The German word for heaven - Wolken - has a strict and apparent strong correlation with the Old English/Frisian root
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 23, 2018 12:09:18 PM

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I know the word 'welkin'.
The meaning of the phrase 'make the welkin ring' was obvious - however, I had never heard the phrase.
It is not true that the only time "welkin" is used in contemporary English is in this phrase.

Out of thirty recent examples of the word's use found, only one was in this phrase.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Friday, March 23, 2018 1:53:36 PM

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In other Germanic languages it still means cloud.

But the English, so happy to talk about the weather, used the word for dark lump, a rock, a clod of earth, to mean a serious cloud!


The Icelandic word for cloud is ský. (I don't know of a Germanic cognate for that meaning - the root is to conceal, skew)

So in English, the dark clods became the clouds, and the cloudy ský became the sky.

Not that I am implying anything about the English weather. Whistle


But a 'cloudless sky' literally just means there are no dense black clods in the clouds! Whistle



(Or maybe it was the other way round. Whenever travelling Germanics pointed to the sky, in Norseland they always ended up pointing at cloudsWhistle )
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