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The train got delayed Options
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 8, 2018 9:08:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Hi
What does "got" mean in every sentence?
1- Sorry we’re late. The train got delayed for over an hour outside Manchester.
2- I’m getting the computer repaired on Monday.
3- I’m going to the supermarket so I’ll get your jacket cleaned if you like.
4- Sorry to keep you waiting. We’re just getting the bill ready for you now.
Parpar1836
Posted: Thursday, March 8, 2018 12:48:40 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2014
Posts: 306
Neurons: 10,201
Location: Rochester, New York, United States
"Get" is one of those ubiquitous words that are used in idioms and phrases.

1. Sorry we’re late. The train got delayed for over an hour outside Manchester.
The train was delayed for over an hour outside Manchester.
The train arrived over an hour late, having been delayed outside Manchester.

2. I’m getting the computer repaired on Monday.
I'm having the computer repaired on Monday.
Our computer will be repaired on Monday.

3. I’m going to the supermarket so I’ll get your jacket cleaned if you like.
I’m going to the supermarket so I’ll take your jacket to the dry cleaners if you like.
I’m going to the supermarket so I’ll have your jacket cleaned while I'm at it.

4. Sorry to keep you waiting. We’re just getting the bill ready for you now.
Sorry to keep you waiting. We’re preparing the bill for you.
Sorry to keep you waiting. I'll bring you the invoice in a minute or so.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 8, 2018 1:32:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Parpar1836 wrote:
"Get" is one of those ubiquitous words that are used in idioms and phrases.

1. Sorry we’re late. The train got delayed for over an hour outside Manchester.
The train was delayed for over an hour outside Manchester.
The train arrived over an hour late, having been delayed outside Manchester.

2. I’m getting the computer repaired on Monday.
I'm having the computer repaired on Monday.
Our computer will be repaired on Monday.

3. I’m going to the supermarket so I’ll get your jacket cleaned if you like.
I’m going to the supermarket so I’ll take your jacket to the dry cleaners if you like.
I’m going to the supermarket so I’ll have your jacket cleaned while I'm at it.

4. Sorry to keep you waiting. We’re just getting the bill ready for you now.
Sorry to keep you waiting. We’re preparing the bill for you.
Sorry to keep you waiting. I'll bring you the invoice in a minute or so.

Thank you so much.
Can I ask the exact meaning or exact synonym for "get" in those that they are in dictionaries?
Parpar1836
Posted: Thursday, March 8, 2018 2:57:44 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2014
Posts: 306
Neurons: 10,201
Location: Rochester, New York, United States
That's what I was doing—or so I thought!
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 8, 2018 2:59:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Parpar1836 wrote:
That's what I was doing—or so I thought!

Thanks a lot
Tara2
Posted: Friday, March 9, 2018 5:24:50 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
What is the difference between 1 and 2 also 3 and 4?

1- The cottage got really badly damaged in the floods last year.
2- The cottage was really badly damaged in the floods last year.

3- Sorry we’re late. The train got delayed for over an hour outside Manchester.
4- Sorry we’re late. The train was delayed for over an hour outside Manchester.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 6:44:06 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,757
Neurons: 46,127
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Although, as Parpar said, the word 'got' is ubiquitously used, it isn't grammatically correct.

In spoken English it's said a lot - as is "Him and me" - but in formal writing/speech both would be equally incorrect.

(I'm surprised Wilmar hasn't posted here - the incorrect use of "got" in sentences 1 and 3 is the kind of usage he usually objects to very much - even in casual English.)
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 4:33:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Romany wrote:
Although, as Parpar said, the word 'got' is ubiquitously used, it isn't grammatically correct.

In spoken English it's said a lot - as is "Him and me" - but in formal writing/speech both would be equally incorrect.

(I'm surprised Wilmar hasn't posted here - the incorrect use of "got" in sentences 1 and 3 is the kind of usage he usually objects to very much - even in casual English.)

Thank you so much.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, March 17, 2018 12:53:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,664
Neurons: 182,069
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
As Wilmar is not back on this thread yet (we both seem to have been off-line for most of the last week) I'll say it.

"Got" is most often redundant.

I have got a ring in my pocket = I have a ring in my pocket.
The "got" is totally unnecessary. Redundancy is grammatically wrong.

Many of the basic meanings of get/got are causative - they imply an effort to do something and some success.
Etymologically, it's from various old words from Germanic roots meaning 'obtain', 'earn', 'learn' - all things you work at, not passive.
It is from the Indo-European root *ghend* with the idea of 'take', 'seize'. An aggressive form.

The police got him (chase after and catch)
He finally got there (succeeded in reaching somewhere)
I got £400 wages last week (worked for and received)
I'll get the coffee (go to the kitchen/cafe and make/prepare/procure)

It is a word often used to replace a verb when the speaker doesn't know which is the correct one. As Romany says, it's ubiquitous.


Note - I'm writing "incorrect" on some usages below. This is "incorrect by traditional English grammar usages" - they are so common that they have almost "become correct by colloquial usage", but they still 'sound terrible' to someone who has been educated in traditional grammar.

I've got . . .(incorrect)
I have . . .(correct)
I got shot (incorrect, unless you really tried to cause yourself to be shot)
I was shot (correct)
The train got delayed (incorrect unless the train deliberately caused something to delay it)
The train was delayed (correct passive)
He got his sister to do . . . (incorrect, but at least it's causative)
He persuaded his sister to . . . (correct)
He had his sister do . . .(correct)
I'll get your jacket cleaned (incorrect, but at least it's causative)
I'll have your jacket cleaned (correct)



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, March 17, 2018 1:22:03 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
As Wilmar is not back on this thread yet (we both seem to have been off-line for most of the last week) I'll say it.

"Got" is most often redundant.

I have got a ring in my pocket = I have a ring in my pocket.
The "got" is totally unnecessary. Redundancy is grammatically wrong.

Many of the basic meanings of get/got are causative - they imply an effort to do something and some success.
Etymologically, it's from various old words from Germanic roots meaning 'obtain', 'earn', 'learn' - all things you work at, not passive.
It is from the Indo-European root *ghend* with the idea of 'take', 'seize'. An aggressive form.

The police got him (chase after and catch)
He finally got there (succeeded in reaching somewhere)
I got £400 wages last week (worked for and received)
I'll get the coffee (go to the kitchen/cafe and make/prepare/procure)

It is a word often used to replace a verb when the speaker doesn't know which is the correct one. As Romany says, it's ubiquitous.


Note - I'm writing "incorrect" on some usages below. This is "incorrect by traditional English grammar usages" - they are so common that they have almost "become correct by colloquial usage", but they still 'sound terrible' to someone who has been educated in traditional grammar.

I've got . . .(incorrect)
I have . . .(correct)
I got shot (incorrect, unless you really tried to cause yourself to be shot)
I was shot (correct)
The train got delayed (incorrect unless the train deliberately caused something to delay it)
The train was delayed (correct passive)
He got his sister to do . . . (incorrect, but at least it's causative)
He persuaded his sister to . . . (correct)
He had his sister do . . .(correct)
I'll get your jacket cleaned (incorrect, but at least it's causative)
I'll have your jacket cleaned (correct)



Thank you so much.
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