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Be assured Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 9:55:21 PM
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Please be assured that your information will never be linked to you individually or to your organization.

I saw the above in one of my emails regarding some survey.

Is "be assured" an imperative sentence and thus a clause with an implied subject you?

Is "be assured" a passive construction or "subjunctive"?

Thanks
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 10:45:22 PM

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Technically, I'd have to call it an imperative sentence.

But also, it's a "stock phrase" meaning "I/we assure you …."

Jigneshbharati
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 2:59:56 AM
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Thanks. How do I know that it's not passive?
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 11:25:02 PM

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The feeling — or at least my feeling — is that "assured" is used here as an adjective.

Others may well disagree with my opinion, but there's probably no real way to be sure just how this particular construction should be defined.

thar
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 2:39:35 AM

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Jigneshbharati wrote:
Thanks. How do I know that it's not passive?


There has been a lot of discussion about that here, with one particular learner trying to define in every case 'which is it?' and many native speakers basically saying 'we don't know, we don't bother to categorise it, because why does it matter?'


The point is, what does it mean?


You can tell that from the context. Like NKM says, it is a stock phrase, because I am sure it is a stock response, in many languages.

So, do you think it is an adjective?
Please be in an assured state

Or is it a passive?
Please become assured by me

I agree with NKM here - they are more concerned with how you should feel that by what should be done to you.But you could just as easily argue it is a passive. I want to assure you. I want you to be assured.

But the only reason you call it an adjective is from the meaning.
The meaning controls the label. So the label had little value - it doesn't help you understand the sentence.
Unless you have to parse the sentence for an exam, I advise you not to waste time trying to work out if every example is a passive or an adjective.
There is a good linguistic reason why many adjectives in English are formed from past participles!
The things that are done to you often control the state you are in.

Sometimes it is obvious which it is. Sometimes the two are so close it is irrelevant.
Sometimes it depends on the context:
I was shot by a sniper. I was shot so I left work early and went home to sleep
I was cold, wet and annoyed. I was annoyed by the loud noise from next door so I went over to complain.

If the label is only there to describe what you think the sentence means, it really isn't worth the effort of trying to label it.
Edited
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 2:50:59 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
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Thanks
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