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onsen
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 9:16:43 PM
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Hello,

A. I cannot come out because I have a cold ― besides, it is pouring down.
(from Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary)

B. I cannot come out because it is pouring down ― besides, I have a cold.
('I have a cold' and 'it is pouring down' change places, and B is obtained.)

Is the use of 'besides' right in the sentence B?

Thank you
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 10:22:13 PM

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Yes. "Besides" is equally right in both sentences.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 10:38:42 PM

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I would argue that these are linked.

If you have a co!d, the fact it is raining is an additional reason not to go out.

'Besides' is for an unrelated reason.

Eg
....besides, I don't have any money
Or
....besides, I have to get up early tomorrow morning.

So it is possible - but for these two reasons I think you would probably use 'and'.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 11:17:02 PM

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At least in American English, it is very unusual to hear "pouring down" to describe a "downpour" or "pouring rain". We usually just say "It's pouring."

For emphasis, we might say "It's pouring rain," or "It's raining cats and dogs."

thar
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 11:22:43 PM

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In BrE , too, I just didn't go into that.

Or the slang version 'it's pissing it down'. Whistle
onsen
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 11:52:49 PM
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thar wrote:

If you have a cold, the fact it is raining is an additional reason not to go out.


Thank you very much.
Does an additional reason mean a weaker or less important reason or just what is added?
That is, isn't there anything connected with which reason is stronger or not with respect to 'I have a cold' and 'it is pouring down'?
Macmillan English Dictionary says 'besides' is used when you are adding another stronger reason …

Quote:

besides function word
2 used when you are adding another stronger reason to support what you are saying:
It’s too late to invite any more people. Besides, you know how Tim hates parties.
(from Macmillan English Dictionary)

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, February 8, 2018 2:02:52 AM

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I have not heard that as a rule.

Other dictionaries (at least the ones in TFD) do not mention it.

The Collins COBUILD English Usage says only that the additional reason should be important (not more important):

Quote:
beside – besides
1. 'beside'
If one thing is beside another, it is next to it or at the side of it.
. . .

4. 'besides' used as an adverb

You can use besides when you are making an additional point or giving an additional reason that you think is important.

I'll only be gone for five days, and besides, you'll have fun while I'm away.
The house was too big. Besides, we couldn't afford it.
Collins COBUILD English Usage

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Thursday, February 8, 2018 2:18:42 AM

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onsen wrote:
thar wrote:

If you have a cold, the fact it is raining is an additional reason not to go out.


Thank you very much.
Does an additional reason mean a weaker or less important reason or just what is added?
That is, isn't there anything connected with which reason is stronger or not with respect to 'I have a cold' and 'it is pouring down'?
Macmillan English Dictionary says 'besides' is used when you are adding another stronger reason …

Quote:

besides function word
2 used when you are adding another stronger reason to support what you are saying:
It’s too late to invite any more people. Besides, you know how Tim hates parties.
(from Macmillan English Dictionary)




No. I mean they combine.
The meanings of this particular example.

I have a cold, and furthermore, it is training. That will make my cold worse.

It is raining, and I have a cold. I don't want to go out in the rain and worsen my cold.


The are not separate. One factor is added to the other, is in addition to the other.
Because it is quite likely you would say:
If I didn't have a cold, I would go out in the rain.
It it were dry, I would go out even though I have a cold.

'Besides' is more for an unrelated reason, as in my example.
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