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take one week off for your sickness Options
robjen
Posted: Tuesday, February 6, 2018 1:26:12 PM
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I am going to make up a sentence below.

(1) Jack has to take one week off for his sickness.

In English, does it make sense to say "take time off for one's sickness"?

Thanks a lot.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, February 6, 2018 1:56:10 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Well, we'd understand what you meant - but no, it's not something we'd say.

Time that each worker is entitled to have off because of illness is called 'sick-leave'. It's now customary to refer to any time off due to illness as "sick leave" whether it's paid time or not.

So we say "Jack's had to take a week's sick-leave." or "Jack's off sick this week." "Jacks ill, he won't be in this week." thus clarifying that he hasn't been fired; he isn't sitting somewhere on a beach sipping tequila - the poor man is ill.

FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Tuesday, February 6, 2018 2:43:54 PM

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The original sentence "Jack has to take one week off for his sickness" is all right. You can say that. Logically it makes sense, doesn't it?

There is another ways of saying to mean the same as well:

take one-week sickie!

Jack has taken one-week sickie!

or

Jack has taken one week off sick.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
srirr
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 1:44:49 AM

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It is OK to say "take time off for one's sickness". It can be understood easily. However, there may be several other ways to convey the meaning.

'Sick leave' has got special meaning in corporate world. It is like a jargon. Among the various types of leaves in an organization, sick leave is a type and normally means a typical period or system of leaves. Can't say about Europe much, but what I have seen that a sick leave is often limited to two or three days in continuation. One may not produce any documents in support. Beyond that, it may be called as Medical Leave, for which necessary documentation . It may sound similar, but have a defined and different meaning. If I say "one week's sick leave", it will be 'wrong' in corporate communications.

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 4:32:42 AM

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In Britain, I don't think that there is that distinction between 'sick-leave' and 'medical leave'.

In my company, one can be off work for a few days "self-certified" - which means that you send your manager a signed attestation that you are too sick to work. This would be paid at eight hours per day (a normal day's work is twelve hours for me).
One can also be off work for a longer period on a 'sick-note' - a certificate signed by the doctor.

It varies, depending on the exact contract you have with your company.

It is usually casually spoken of in simple terms as "off sick" or "off on the sick" (as Romany and FROSTY said).

"He's been off sick for a month now."
"He's not in today, he's off sick."
"Some people make a habit of being off on the sick at least once a month."
"Jack had to take a week off sick."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 5:48:30 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Frosty and Srirr,

As I said - the original sentence would be understood: we'd know what you were talking about. But it *isn't* ok to say. We don't take time off "for" illness. "Illness" isn't a separate entity that has needs and wants: and we don't do things its behalf. (e.g. "I'm doing this for John." Fine. "I'd like to do it for Mary."OK. But "I'm doing this for Illness"? No.).

We take leave *because of* or *due to* illness.
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