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lieutenant or deputy Options
Helenej
Posted: Friday, February 2, 2018 9:27:43 AM

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Joined: 9/24/2013
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Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
Could you please explain the difference between the words lieutenant and deputy.

Lieutenant – a person who helps somebody who is above them in rank or who performs their duties when that person is unable to.

Deputy - a person who is the next most important person below a business manager, a head of a school, a political leader, etc. and who does the person’s job when he or she is away.

I have a guess that a person in authority may have a few lieutenants and only one deputy. Can it be the answer?


thar
Posted: Friday, February 2, 2018 10:01:56 AM

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Well, from its linguistic roots a lieutenant is someone who takes your place, but in reality it is a rank - army, police (US), you can even use it for the quasi-military hierarchy of gangs or organised crime. It is a role within that hierarchy.

There are more formal uses, in a ruling hierarchy, regarding mostly ceremonial roles like a Lord Lieutenant of a county in the UK, where they are there as the representative of the power.
It is not someone who takes your place.
And would not use it for any role outside that military context. (If it is used that way, it is explicitly using that military metaphor - it would only be a derogatory description of the organisation - it would never be a job title. And using it could be very insulting - it could imply you are a mafia boss!)

For anything in normal life, you have a deputy - someone below you in the heirarchy who can assume your powers while you're not there.

(Caveat - BrE speaker only)
NKM
Posted: Friday, February 2, 2018 10:06:39 PM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Here in the U.S., a county Sheriff may have many Deputies (or "Deputy Sheriffs"). Other police departments tend to have ranks such as Sergeants, Lieutenants and Captains, with a Chief or Superintendent at the head of the organization.

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, February 3, 2018 7:24:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
thar wrote:
Well, from its linguistic roots a lieutenant is someone who takes your place, but in reality it is a rank - army, police (US), you can even use it for the quasi-military hierarchy of gangs or organised crime. It is a role within that hierarchy.

There are more formal uses, in a ruling hierarchy, regarding mostly ceremonial roles like a Lord Lieutenant of a county in the UK, where they are there as the representative of the power.
It is not someone who takes your place.
And would not use it for any role outside that military context. (If it is used that way, it is explicitly using that military metaphor - it would only be a derogatory description of the organisation - it would never be a job title. And using it could be very insulting - it could imply you are a mafia boss!)

For anything in normal life, you have a deputy - someone below you in the heirarchy who can assume your powers while you're not there.

(Caveat - BrE speaker only)


The Lord Lieutenant is acting as a subordinate of The Queen in a ceremonial role, in a way they are taking her place.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Helenej
Posted: Saturday, February 3, 2018 2:49:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/24/2013
Posts: 1,959
Neurons: 9,761
Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
thar wrote:
And would not use it for any role outside that military context. (If it is used that way, it is explicitly using that military metaphor - it would only be a derogatory description of the organisation - it would never be a job title. And using it could be very insulting - it could imply you are a mafia boss!)

Now I see why one of the American journalists, while interviewing the American diplomat Kurt Volker, referred this way to Vladislav Surkov, whose official post is called an aide to the president of Russia.

Thank you very much, thar, NKM and Sarriesfan.
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