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Gump and Woggle-bug Options
papo_308
Posted: Thursday, February 01, 2018 2:42:09 PM
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Hi all,

I'm reading The marvelous Land of Oz to my granddaughters now, with online translation between my eyes and mouth, that is. It's sometimes difficult to find suitable equivalents of some expressions, especially names. Two of them are Gump and Woggle-bug:

The Woggle-bug had taken from its position over the mantle-piece in the great hallway the head of a Gump, which was adorned with wide-spreading antlers; ...... This Gump resembled an Elk's head, only the nose turned upward in a saucy manner and there were whiskers upon its chin, like those of a billy-goat.

Now, I know the meaning of Gump as a person of a rather low intelect, there are some other meanings listed in the Urban dictionary, but none fits in here. Can you tell me what is your idea of a Gump as described here?

And Woggle-bug, well, I found the meaning of woggle, but it has nothing to do with bugs. This is not such a big problem, I translated it simply as bug, but I'd like to know what the English or American children are supposed to visualize when they hear it.

Thank you.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, February 01, 2018 2:55:45 PM

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Hi papo!

Well, English or American children are supposed to visualize "something resembling an elk with a saucy upturned nose and whiskers on its chin" when the writer mentions a gump.
Different children would, of course, have totally different pictures in their minds.

A woggle-bug - unless the author described it in some other way, sounds (to me) like a bug which wobbles and bobbles when it moves.

bobble
noun 1. a short jerky motion, as of a cork floating on disturbed water; bobbing movement
verb 5. (intr) sport (of a ball) to bounce with a rapid erratic motion due to an uneven playing surface

wobble v.intr.
1. To move or rotate with an uneven or rocking motion or unsteadily from side to side.


They are totally new, invented words.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
papo_308
Posted: Thursday, February 01, 2018 3:16:57 PM
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Thank you Drago, for your opinion. The only meaning of woggle I'been able to find (in Dictionary.com) is "the ring of leather through which a Scout neckerchief is threaded", so I thought it might perhaps suggest that the bug has a very slim waist, but in the numerous illustrations to the book, which can be found on the Internet, it is pictured like a normal bug.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, February 01, 2018 4:43:20 PM
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Yes, I would say to keep in mind that this isn't a nature book, it's a kid's story. A brief description of a non existent creature is all a child needs to let their imagination run wild - which is, after all, the reason we read to them!

Papo - I wouldn't worry too much - they are made up names for made-up creatures. Why not ask your grandchildren what *they* think a woggle-bug looks like, and get them to draw a picture of one? Whatever they draw will be *exactly* what a woggle-bug looks like!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, February 01, 2018 8:01:46 PM

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Yes - that is the only meaning of "woggle" - it is only used in the special case of Scout neckerchiefs - not in other cases.

I just gave what my impression of "woggle-bug" would be if I were a child hearing the phrase.

I am used to the phrases and names used by Lewis Carroll - which are very much based on "the sound of the word".



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
mactoria
Posted: Thursday, February 01, 2018 10:00:11 PM
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Papo: As you know, "The Land of Oz" is a book (one of a series) written by an American named L. Frank Baum almost a hundred years ago. It's all fanciful, creatures named in the book(s) aren't things that are known by any specific definition or description unless Baum described them in the book(s) which he sometimes didn't. Being fanciful, it's all up to the reader -- or in your case, the child's grandparent --- to come up with a mental picture of what a 'gump' or 'woggle-bug' would look like; with the exception of any descriptions that creatures may be given in the actual book(s). It's an American book, not British, so don't assume a "gump" or "woggle-bug" was intended to mean or describe something that the British (or other regions or countries) commonly use. To the extent that there's no written description of these creatures or other things in the book, just use your imagination in helping your grandchild(ren) come up with what they look, sound, or feel like. That's the beauty of children's books like the Oz books: you get to make it up yourself, and you and your grandchild(ren) will have your very own shared image of these things!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, February 02, 2018 4:45:13 AM

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Just imagine how a houyhnhnm would look like.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Parpar1836
Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 9:45:03 AM
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"Woggle-bug" was Bum's humorous name for a sand crab. I learned this from Katharine Rogers' biography of L. Frank Baum.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 10:06:08 AM
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Thanks for that, Parpar - it definitely sheds some light!
IMcRout
Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 11:16:59 AM

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Didn't Heffalumps do away with Woggle-Bugs?

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 11:28:32 AM

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No - that was the Oliphaunts.

The Heffalumps drove out all the Slithy Toves.
That's why the borogroves were mimsy and the mome-raths were outgribing.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Parpar1836
Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 1:20:23 PM
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You're quite welcome. My misspelling of Baum's name was in no way intentional. Unfortunately, I discovered it too late to edit. Oh, well, onwards.

Here's the pertinent passage in Rogers's biography:

Baum's Woggle-Bug owed his existence to lucky chance. As Baum related in an interview in the Philadelphia North American (October 3, 1904), a little girl playing in the sand on Coronado Beach picked up a sand crab and asked him what it was. "A Wogglebug"—"the first term that popped into my head." The child was delighted with the word, and so was Maud [his wife]when Baum mentioned it to her that evening; she "told me I should put the Wogglebug in The Marvelous Land of Oz. The book was one third written and Jack Pumpkinhead was the hero, but I brought in the Wogglebug right away. After that H. M. Wogglebug, T.E., was the hero and has become my most popular character."

—Katharine M. Rogers, L Frank Baum, Creator of Oz (New York: St. Marton's Press, 2002), p. 122

H.M.: Highly Magnified
T.E.: Thoroughly Educated

Baum was inventive when it came to naming places and characters. As Lewis Carroll did, he delighted in coining humorous names. He was also addicted to puns.

As I understand it, the story about his hitting upon the name for Oz through the medium of the labels on his filing cabinets (A-N and O-Z) is strictly apocryphal. I think it originated with one of his sons.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 6:35:02 AM

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Willy Wonka meets Whangdoodles, Hornswogglers, Snozzwangers, etc. while exploring Oompa Loompa Land.




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
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