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Can this adjective be used to describe a person? Options
robjen
Posted: Monday, January 29, 2018 9:27:27 PM
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Abominable means something that is bad or unpleasant.

For example, I think you can say:

(1) an abominable crime
(2) an abominable behavior
(3) abominable weather

Can you say: an abominable person?

Thanks for your help.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, January 29, 2018 10:09:11 PM

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robjen wrote:
Abominable means something that is bad or unpleasant.

For example, I think you can say:

(1) an abominable crime
(2) an abominable behavior
(3) abominable weather

Can you say: an abominable person?

Thanks for your help.


Yes, quite easily.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 2:38:13 AM

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Just be aware it has baggage.

It will make some people think of the Abominable Snowman (aka Yeti).

So although it is a harsh word for a thing, using it for a person is rather comical.

I don't know if Americans have the Abominable Snowman?






Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:15:16 PM

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That, Love the pix, especially the second one.

Applause Applause Applause

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:28:14 PM

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I think I've heard (or seen in newspapers) serial murderers and people of that sort described as 'abominable'.
And some religious groups consider certain types of people "abominations".

I think that the American version of the Yeti is Bigfoot.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 1:13:06 AM
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Example sentences:


You may imagine how I felt when I heard this abominable old rogue addressing another in the very same words of flattery as he had used to myself. (Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson)


A wager of twenty thousand pounds lost,
because he, like a precious fool,
had gone into that abominable pagoda! (Around the World in Eighty Days, Jules Verne)


I cannot convey the sense of abominable desolation
that hung over the world. (The Time Machine, H. G. Wells)


There are many who consider as an injury to themselves any conduct which they have a distaste for, and resent it as an outrage to their feelings; as a religious bigot, when charged with disregarding the religious feelings of others, has been known to retort that they disregard his feelings, by persisting in their abominable worship or creed. ( John Stuart Mill, On Liberty )


Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 1:57:08 AM

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But notice - all those quotes are from writers born in the nineteenth century (and all but one died in the nineteenth, too).
It's not such a common word these days.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 5:03:11 AM
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Drago,

I think perhaps its because it isn't used much nowadays that it seems to carry more weight when it *is* used.

When people are saying things like "It's not right", "It's unacceptable", "It's offensive", someone who states flatly and ardently "It's abominable" really makes a point!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 7:48:37 AM

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I make the distinction between 'abominable' - which I can't remember encountering much, and find vaguely comical, and not very powerful
And
'an abomination' which is very strong, Biblical in tone (unnatural, a sin against God) - like zealous US preachers proclaiming a flood is because of homosexuality.


Funny how we contextualise words so strongly.

Ah, that is the 'derived' meaning - 'away from man'.

Quote:
abominari "shun as an ill omen," from ab "off, away from" + omin-, stem of omen.

In biblical use, often "that which is ceremonially impure." The meaning was intensified by folk etymology derivation from Latin ab homine "away from man" (thus "beastly"); Wyclif and Chaucer both have abhominacioun, and abhominable was mocked by Shakespeare in "Love's Labour's Lost."


The difference then is whether you think 'away from man' refers to a gay man or a yeti. d'oh!
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 10:12:39 AM

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I used the word "reprehensible" in the title of a thread over a year ago to stress the seriousness. That is probably used more than "abominable" except to mean Bigfoot here.

Whenever I hear the word "abomination" I think Bible and preachers screaming. It turns me right off and I never use the word "sin" for the same reason.

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.
RuthP
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 12:24:11 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I think I've heard (or seen in newspapers) serial murderers and people of that sort described as 'abominable'.
And some religious groups consider certain types of people "abominations".

I think that the American version of the Yeti is Bigfoot.

Yes. Also called Sasquatch..
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 6:37:59 PM
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I came very late to hearing that "biblical" concept of 'abomination. (I mean seriously late - like in the past 10 years) Either it isn't used that way in the Catholic church; or the nuns deliberately kept the abominable bits from our innocent ears.(Drago - can you remember?).

To my mother garden gnomes and plastic flowers were 'abominations'; and uncouth people and delinquents had 'abominable' manners and speech patterns.

So as I also never lived anywhere with snow, the thing the word brings mostly to my mind is my mother! (Good grief: imagine how that would sound in one of those word-association games: - Q. Abominable. A. My mother!)
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