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NaN amount Options
taurine
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 2:49:17 PM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
Do anybody knows what does it mean 'NaN' amount?

I am also surprised seeing: beef null, pork shoulder null, kosher salt null.
What 'null' could possibly mean in the recipe below, please?

Cooktime: 1 hour 4 minutes

Makes 12 servings
Ingredients for Carolina Sliders Amount
1/2 head green cabbage cored and shredded
NaN kosher salt to taste
5 green onions white and light green portions, thinly sliced
1 carrots large, peeled and grated
3 tablespoons whole grain mustard
2 tablespoons honey
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
NaN freshly ground pepper to taste
112 pounds pork shoulder null
NaN beef null
NaN kosher salt null
NaN freshly ground pepper null
12 rolls Parker House, halved
NaN barbecue sauce The Pit Western-style North Carolina, for serving

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 2:59:32 PM

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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
taurine wrote:
Do anybody knows what does it mean 'NaN' amount?

I only know the word in the context of floating-point calculations. The format used to store a float in memory is such as there are patterns of bits that do not represent any number. Those are called NaNs, NaN standing for not a number:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NaN



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
taurine
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 3:15:07 PM

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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
taurine wrote:
Do anybody knows what does it mean 'NaN' amount?

I only know the word in the context of floating-point calculations. The format used to store a float in memory is such as there are patterns of bits that do not represent any number. Those are called NaNs, NaN standing for not a number:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NaN


OK, Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1.
Now I think I could understand 'NaN' in the context as based on previous experience.
That is, I should remember how much I used before.
Thank you.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Fyfardens
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 3:54:17 PM
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[quote=taurine]Do anybody knows what does it mean 'NaN' amount?/quote]

It means nothing at all to this (elderly) speaker of BrE.


I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
taurine
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 4:24:04 PM

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Fyfardens wrote:

[quote=taurine]Do anybody knows what does it mean 'NaN' amount?/quote]

It mean nothing at all to this (elderly) speaker of BrE.


Why did you answer at all if it means nothing to you?

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 4:27:51 PM

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taurine wrote:
Fyfardens wrote:

[quote=taurine]Do anybody knows what does it mean 'NaN' amount?/quote]

It mean nothing at all to this (elderly) speaker of BrE.


Why did you answer at all if it means nothing at all to you?


Possibly to indicate it's not a common usage, I have never seen it myself either.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
taurine
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 4:42:35 PM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
taurine wrote:
Fyfardens wrote:

[quote=taurine]Do anybody knows what does it mean 'NaN' amount?/quote]

It mean nothing at all to this (elderly) speaker of BrE.


Why did you answer at all if it means nothing at all to you?


Possibly to indicate it's not a common usage, I have never seen it myself either.


OK, Sarrriesfan.
I have watched today on TV CNBC channel a program 'Profit' and I tried to follow certain adds visible on the TV screen.
I have discerned a logo of 'Pat LaFrieda' and I have become curious about it.
When I have looked closer on Pat LaFrieda through my search engine I found the recipe and I couldn't understand what is the meaning of 'NaN' and 'null' as visible at the beginning of this post.
The recipe is not from the Pat LaFrieda but from the page which had been put on display as a marketing - related additional website.

Because I value highly 'Profit' authorized by CNBC channel I am sometimes following the lead given as an incentive to look at companies which are contributing to those who want to change their business.
I like people who want to be engaged through their businesses helping other people make their live better.
Eventually those who help struggling businesses make their own life better, too.
Not in material terms, only.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
taurine
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 5:30:29 PM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
I have found another one:


The Pioneer Woman


Cooktime: 5 minutes

Makes 1 servings
Ingredients for Freddy's Burgers Amount
4 ounces ground beef weight, roughly
NaN salt To Taste
1 slice American cheese
1 whole hamburger buns small, Standard Size

I like American food. What may American language experts say on it?

NaN

This one above I have taken from my results to look for 'The American Standard Burger'.

It seems like 'NaN' is quite common in the U.S.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Fyfardens
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 6:50:23 PM
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I tracked down that recipe - http://tastykitchen.com/recipes/main-courses/freddye28099s-burgers/.

I saw no sign of 'NaN'.

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 7:33:01 PM

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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
taurine wrote:

NaN kosher salt null
NaN freshly ground pepper null

To a computer programmer this looks like there is a table of 3 columns and in these particular lines the values given for the first and the last column are illegal - that is a NaN value for the first and the Null value for the last. A correct program would use a function such as IsNaN

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/isNaN

to assess the value of a variable and display usefull information. It looks like this has not been done and the script engine defaults to these (nonsensical to a regular human) words.


აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
mactoria
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 10:17:13 PM
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This one above I have taken from my results to look for 'The American Standard Burger'.

It seems like 'NaN' is quite common in the U.S.[/quote]


Taurine: Like Fyfardens, I didn't find any "NaN" when I looked up this recipe on Ree Drummond's website, so not sure why you found it that way. As for "NaN" being 'quite coming in the US," as an American I'd have to disagree, at least as it would apply to such everyday things as recipes. It's possible that in certain specific fields it is fairly commonly used; however, it's not an abbreviation I've ever seen in a recipe, a financial or computer article, or anything else until you posed this question. Perhaps it is an abbreviation that is new, and we will see it used in common usage (it seems that new abbreviations --- like LOL, YOLO, FWIW, etc. --- pop up every day as our language is changed by technology) in the near future.

As for recipes, normally when a recipe author wants to indicate that a tiny or unknown amount of an ingredient should be used, they will write "trace" or "a dash" or something similar. "NaN" is just not (yet?) a common word in recipes.
NKM
Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 11:20:34 PM

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It puts one in mind of a rare salt (sodium nitride), but the correct formula would be Na₃N.

And I can't imagine that it would be used with food.



Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Monday, January 29, 2018 2:34:25 PM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
NaN = non a number
In the recipe format (as the recipe is stored in the data), there is a place for a numeric value, the unit of measure, and the ingredient. For example, 3 cups flour.
For this salt ingredient, the numeric value was not entered, and evidently not initialized, as the chef did not tell you a specific, measurable amount to use. The software that presents the recipe to the viewer then, did not know what to make of the lack of a good numeric value, and the application did not test for a condition to recognize a good ingredient instruction that would appropriately NOT include a numeric measurement value. And so, some the result is "NaN".
Bad Programmer! Bad, Bad Programmer!
RuthP
Posted: Monday, January 29, 2018 5:28:44 PM

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My best guess is what you have here is an editing mark (NaN) used at the publication, that was missed when the recipe was sent to press. A proof reader or editor marked the ingredient with "NaN" to let the typesetter know to tab over so all the ingredients would line up in a column (yeah, I know, it's all digital now, still . . . typesetter). Instead of following the instruction, whoever did the layout left "NaN" in as a part of the recipe, instead of writing "Salt to taste" without a number in front of it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 11:14:15 PM

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It's also a bit odd to have a hundred and twelve pounds of pork - plus beef - in a recipe for a meal for twelve people.

That's more than ten pounds of meat each.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 5:10:34 AM
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Drago -


One hundred and ten pounds of meat for 12 people?

Must be a South African recipe!Whistle Whistle
coag
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 3:10:33 PM

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Joined: 3/27/2010
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Here's what Scilab, a software package for numerical computations, gives.

1/0=inf _____ 1/inf=0 _____ 0/inf=0 _____ 0/0=nan _____ 0*inf=nan _____ 1+inf=inf _____ 1+nan=nan _____ nan/inf=nan

taurine
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 3:24:20 PM

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Joined: 4/20/2016
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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
Yeah...
I always was of the opinion that Drag0nspeaker is the best.
Beast discerningDrool
True dragon.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
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