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Rickman worked as a dresser to Nigel Hawthorne Options
Tara2
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 1:24:59 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 363
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Hi
Can "to" be replaced with "for" in the following sentences?
If it can, What is the difference in use between "to" and "for"?

1- Rickman worked as a dresser to Nigel Hawthorne.
2- He was an official interpreter to the government of Nepal.
thar
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 2:29:31 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 17,717
Neurons: 71,663
Tara2 wrote:
Hi
Can "to" be replaced with "for" in the following sentences?
If it can, What is the difference in use between "to" and "for"?


There are nuances and plain differences.

1- Rickman worked as a dresser to Nigel Hawthorne.

This job is like a relationship. He did not work for Hawthorne, he worked for the theatre.
He worked as a dresser to him, ( like being a partner to him, or a friend to him. or an opponent to him - a relationship)


2- He was an official interpreter to the government of Nepal.


This is odd - it suggests he was employed by some other government to interpret Nepalese for them.

Sorry to say this again but context is everything. Just taking one sentence and saying what it means is not possible. Or what it would mean with another word.


Luckily, except for language exercises that never happens. You always have context.
Tara2
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 2:52:55 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 363
Neurons: 1,656
Thank you very much thar

From dictionary: 'To' can be used as a way of introducing the person or organization you are employed by, when you perform some service for them.
thar
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 3:03:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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True, but there are other meanings too.

For example, the American ambassador to Britain doesn't work for Britain.

It can be used to ......
Not 'it is used to.....
Tara2
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 3:16:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 363
Neurons: 1,656
thar wrote:
True, but there are other meanings too.

For example, the American ambassador to Britain doesn't work for Britain.

It can be used to ......
Not 'it is used to.....

Sorry thar, But I don't understand what you mean.
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