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What does the word " restraint " mean here? Options
Aventador LP700-4
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:47:46 PM
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So much of deciding the winner of a test like this comes down to personal priorities. The Kia Stinger is clearly the more exciting car, with that hellacious motor, punk rock looks, and a big presence on the street. The BMW 430i GC, meanwhile, couldn’t be more different, with refinement, restraint, and access to a far more grown-up version of driving fun.

Does it mean " having good control and stability "?

Source:
https://www.motor1.com/reviews/225429/bmw-430i-gran-coupe-kia-stinger-comparison/
thar
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:24:35 PM

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No, this is about the design.
It is refined.
The designers showed restraint -they held back from doing anything too wild and showy.


Unlike :
Quote:
hellacious motor, punk rock looks, and a big presence


They could have benn unrestrained and gone crazy, in terms of power and looks






But the design is restrained. Which this reviewer counts as a positive attribute for a car.
Aventador LP700-4
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:25:40 PM
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So, it refers to conservative design of the BMW.

I don't know how you interpret the correct meaning of the words in different contexts.

For example in this context, refinement could also mean the engine is silent and has no vibration while operating. (engine refinement).

English is a very vague language! It seems that only the writer understands his own writing!
pjharvey
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 3:56:17 AM
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It's not English that is vague. It's the writer. They don't say what "refinement" and "restraint" refer to.
I could translate the paragraph into Italian, my native language, and still it would retain exactly the same ambiguities, though making perfect sense.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 4:18:18 AM

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I can clearly understand that text, and could translate it into Finnish.
Just for fun I tried Google Translate to it. The result was hilarious ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
thar
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 4:56:42 AM

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You can mostly tell because the context is comparing it to the image the other car projects. So this is about image and character, not technical points.

Also because the words just aren't used that way, which is just experience.
Romany
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 5:44:31 AM
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Also, this is Ad-speak.

Those who work in Advertising are not scholars or academics. They are people struggling to pay off their mortgage and send their kids to school, who get a huge bonus if their advert is chosen.

Advertisements are mainly a way of getting "concepts" across to people: certain key-words build up a "picture" in a person's head: luxury, conspicuous spending, superiority,flattery, envy etc. Whoever comes up with something that gets the right "picture" across is the winner.

Ad-speak isn't meant to be literature: it's just a very crude, billion-dollar industry whose aim is getting people to part with large sums of money.
thar
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 5:50:24 AM

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Ah, but it works, doesn't it?

People buy stuff.

Doesn't that suggest that ad writers are the most skilled manipulators of people, and of language?


(except for these press releases about cars - most of them are absolute drivel). Whistle
Romany
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 6:01:46 AM
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Of course it does! Good ad.people are worth their weight in gold.

However, I was responding to Adventador's frustration with the kind of English used. So I was pointing out that English is used differently in ad-speak: - it doesn't come from grammar books and canonical literature. It's judged on its success in selling products - the "vagueness" he notes being a staple when it's a "concept" you want to get across and not grammar. There are different "rules" or logic.
Hope123
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 10:24:27 AM

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It's not vague if you take it in context and contrast it with the sentence before it describing the KIA as Thar says. The BMW is the opposite and it is more "grown-up". More mature drivers who are past the "racing" revving flashy type of driving would appreciate the BMW more. Nothing wrong with either style - it's a matter of preference.

We have a whole section or even two in the weekend paper called "Wheels" where writers analyze what they think are the best cars. To me they are not really ad writers but are writing opinions about many cars - in the middle between ads and news. This piece would fit into that opinion section about cars very nicely.

Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace. Albert Schweitzer
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