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get around to doing something. (Phrasal verbs) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 8:49:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi,
As far as I know,
"Get around, get round, get about" can mean "avoiding something", "traveling a lot" or "letting something be known"

However,
One Arab person was trying to translate English phrasal verbs into Arabic.
He/she translated "get around to doing something" as "I don't have enough time to do something" in the following:
"I didn't get around to telling her. "

Take this scenario:
One friend of yours asked "why did you not invite me for the party?"
You: I didn't get around to it."



Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 8:58:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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You are ignoring the negative part.

I didn't get around to it.

So what does it mean when you do get around to it?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 9:33:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,486
Neurons: 162,175
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Those are three separate (different) phrasal verbs.

Get round/get around (Transitive) avoid.
"I hate going to his parties - I'll find a way to get around it."

Get around/get round (intransitive) travel a lot. (can be metaphorical)
You've lived in four apartments in the last year - you really get around!
I've seen her out with five different boyfriends this week - she gets around.
Everybody knows I got a new job. News really gets round fast on Twitter!

Get around to (transitive) (usually followed by a gerund, 'it' or other pronoun) - having time to do, making time to do or making effort to do something.
"Have you had lunch?" - "No. I've been so busy I didn't get around to it." (didn't have time)
"Why didn't you call?" - "I was busy reading a novel and didn't get around to it." (did not make the effort to do it)
"I can see you are busy - when will you get around to cutting the grass on the lawn?" (make time to; include in a schedule of actions)

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:29:52 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Once again - think about the meaning!!

If a FRIEND asked why you didn't invite them to your party, (which must have hurt their feelings very much) answering "I didn't get around to it" would be the harshest, cruelest thing to say to them. They would certainly never bother talking to you again - not to mention being your friend!
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:19:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,784
Neurons: 10,062
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Thank you all of you( Thar, Drag0nspeaker, and Romany) very much,
Yes, using phrasal verbs needs care for the meaning. In Arabic, there are not many phrasal verbs as comprised to English. I really even don't know what the phrasal verbs in Arabic are. (I never ever came across one, but I read there are a few). Idioms in Arabic, on the other hand, are a lot.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
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