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Should "president" be in uppercase? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 8:01:42 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,985
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Mr Francis Lim, president of the Singapore Motor Workshop Association, said, "Floods are tricky...".

1. Should "president" be in uppercase?
2. Is the full stop needed in both British and American English?

Thanks.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 8:47:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,506
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

The capital letter question is a little tricky.

I would not use a capital letter.
I think the generally accepted 'rule' is "If the word "president" or "director" or whatever is a title, it has a capital letter; if it is the position or job of the person, it does not."

So, if his actual title is "President of the Singapore Motor Workshop Association" or "President of the United States of America", then it has a capital letter in that phrase.

"Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the President of the Singapore Motor Workshop Association."
"You know Mr Lim - he's the president in our affiliate, The Singapore Motor Workshop Association."


*************
Punctuation is not separated by "British" and "American" - there are different 'style guides' which have different opinions.
In America, the 'APA style-guide' and the 'AP style-guide' and the 'Chicago Manual of Style' are quite popular. In Britain, the 'Oxford Press' style and 'Logical Punctuation' are popular.
However, some American companies insist on the 'Oxford Press' style, and some British companies use Chicago or APA.

The full stop is definitely needed in Logical style. The logic is:

1. The quotation "Floods are tricky . . ." is NOT a full sentence (as shown by the ellipsis), so there is no full stop inside the quotation marks.

2. The line
Mr Francis Lim, president of the Singapore Motor Workshop Association, said, "Floods are tricky...".
IS a full sentence, so it has to end with a full stop.

All very logical.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Fyfardens
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:40:37 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 12/16/2017
Posts: 244
Neurons: 3,661
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
.

All very logical.


However, if 'Floods are tricky' were a complete sentence, logic would suggest:

Mr Francis Lim, president of the Singapore Motor Workshop Association, said "Floods are tricky.".

It would also suggest:

However, if 'Floods are tricky.' were a complete sentence, logic would suggest:

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:58:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,506
Neurons: 153,691
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Fyfardens wrote:
However, if 'Floods are tricky' were a complete sentence, logic would suggest:

Mr Francis Lim, president of the Singapore Motor Workshop Association, said "Floods are tricky.".

It would also suggest:

However, if 'Floods are tricky.' were a complete sentence, logic would suggest:
[/color]

Yes - that was the original style - which has evolved recently to omit a full-stop in the middle of a sentence and a second full stop with no words between.

"The tone symbols should be placed before or after the second quotation mark according as they belong to the quotation or to the containing sentence. If both quotation and containing sentence need a tone symbol, both should be used, with the quotation mark between them."
Fowler's Modern English Usage - 1908

It could get rather silly if there is a quotation within a quotation:

I said, 'Did he ask "Did Mary say 'Yes.'?"?'.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Fyfardens
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 10:17:22 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 12/16/2017
Posts: 244
Neurons: 3,661
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


I said, 'Did he ask "Did Mary say 'Yes.'?"?'.


That is glorious. It has inspired me to write to a colleague "Drag0nspeaker wrote "I said, 'Did he ask "Did Mary say 'Yes.'?"?'.".
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:16:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 40,395
Neurons: 322,749
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Applause Applause Applause


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
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