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Maggie Q
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 7:35:37 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 169
Neurons: 3,091
Of course everyone in town called him Junior, he thought of himself as Junior, but he hadn’t realized how much he hated it, how much he hoped-to-die-in-a-maggot-pie hated it until he
heard it come bolting out from between the spooky tombstone teeth of the bitch who had caused him so much trouble.

Question 1: What's the meaning of 'how much he hoped-to-die-in-a-maggot-pie hated it'?

Question 2: What's the meaning of 'hoped-to-die-in-a-maggot-pie'?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 7:46:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,486
Neurons: 162,175
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

I have no idea.

This book seems to be becoming wilder, more babyish and less logical as you carry on reading . . .

*************
The only bit of it which seems familiar is 'hope to die' which is part of another idiomatic phrase.

"Tell the truth and hope to die" - which little children used to say when they felt that someone would not believe them.


"I am telling the truth and I hope I die if I lie."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Maggie Q
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 7:51:24 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 169
Neurons: 3,091
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I have no idea.

This book seems to be becoming wilder, more babyish and less logical as you carry on reading . . .

*************
The only bit of it which seems familiar is 'hope to die' which is part of another idiomatic phrase.

"Tell the truth and hope to die" - which little children used to say when they felt that someone would not believe them.


"I am telling the truth and I hope I die if I lie."



thank you


Then he slapped her, and thinking pretty much ceased.

He didn’t get much into that first one, because he was still in the doorway and there wasn’t much room to swing; he could only draw his arm back to half-cock.

Question 4: Does 'he could only draw his arm back to half-cock' imply that he could but hadn't drawn it yet?


But as slaps from half-cock go, this one wasn’t bad. She went stumbling backward against the newel post of the stairway and the towel flew off her hair. Wet brown snaggles hung around
her cheeks, making her look like Medusa.

Question 5: In this case, what's the meaning of 'as'?
pjharvey
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 8:21:34 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/13/2012
Posts: 852
Neurons: 52,033
"hoped-to-die-in-a-maggot-pie" seems to come from a poem by Robert Stevens, "I'm sorry", which goes "...I'm sorry...I caled you maggot pie...I'm sorry...I said, I hope you die".
I think the saying is coined by the writer to specify that his (Junior's) kind of hatred is a childish type of hatred, such as the one felt by the character in the poem.

Question 4 (I haven't seen question 3): it means that he could and did.
Question 5: "as" here means "in the same way as".

Maggie, you have already been asked to stop calling all your posts "questions"; why won't you stop?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 8:25:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,486
Neurons: 162,175
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi again.

It just says that there was not enough room in the doorway to swing his arm back properly before slapping her.
"There wasn't much room to swing". He could not swing his arm all the way back. He could only swing it to half-cock.

********
"As" would be something like "in the way that" (definition #2 in the Collins Dictionary), but in this sentence is used as part of an idiomatic phrase:

"As . . . go" means "taking all the possible examples of . . ."

"As cars go, this is a great one." - 'From a choice of all possible cars, this car is great.'

"As building-materials go, brick and stone are the classics."
- 'Considering all the different things people have used to build, brick and stone are classic.'

"As slaps from half-cock go, this one wasn’t bad." - 'Considering all the possible slaps from half-cock, this one was not bad' (it made her stumble backwards and hit the newel and knocked the towel from around her hair).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Maggie Q
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 8:48:38 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 169
Neurons: 3,091
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi again.

It just says that there was not enough room in the doorway to swing his arm back properly before slapping her.
"There wasn't much room to swing". He could not swing his arm all the way back. He could only swing it to half-cock.

********
"As" would be something like "in the way that" (definition #2 in the Collins Dictionary), but in this sentence is used as part of an idiomatic phrase:

"As . . . go" means "taking all the possible examples of . . ."

"As cars go, this is a great one." - 'From a choice of all possible cars, this car is great.'

"As building-materials go, brick and stone are the classics."
- 'Considering all the different things people have used to build, brick and stone are classic.'

"As slaps from half-cock go, this one wasn’t bad." - 'Considering all the possible slaps from half-cock, this one was not bad' (it made her stumble backwards and hit the newel and knocked the towel from around her hair).



thank you

Question: this one wasn't bad --- does 'this one' refer to 'that first one'?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:04:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,486
Neurons: 162,175
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes - the writer refers to the slap as "he slapped her", "that first one", "this one".

The fact that one phrase uses "this" and another uses "that" does not make sense to me, but fits with the 'childish' nature of Junior's thoughts.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Maggie Q
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:12:31 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 169
Neurons: 3,091
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Yes - the writer refers to the slap as "he slapped her", "that first one", "this one".

The fact that one phrase uses "this" and another uses "that" does not make sense to me, but fits with the 'childish' nature of Junior's thoughts.


thank you :)

Have a great day!
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