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'Are you calling me a liar' (Verbs with two objects) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 7:56:21 AM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi everyone!
While looking through verbs with two objects, I didn't find "call" was listed although it has two objects. Where the marked ones with blue colour are direct objects, which answer the question: what? And the indirect objects are marked with red colour, which answer the question: to whom/ who/ which (I call the things that is given, sent, bought, etc the direct object; the person who gets it is the indirect object. (Thus, I think w can omit the indirect object).
Give:
I gave you a letter.
Cost:
The repair cost me a lot.

Call:
Are you calling me a liar?
Grammarians call comma an Oxford comma in some structures.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 8:13:25 AM

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This time your question doesn't make much sense, Acoop.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Fyfardens
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 8:18:48 AM
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Neurons: 3,661
In 'Are you calling me a liar?'. there is no indirect object. 'Me' is the direct object and 'a liar' the object complement.

I really don't think you want to spend time on this It will not improve your ability to communicate in English at all.
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 8:20:53 AM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,691
Neurons: 9,658
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
This time your question doesn't make much sense, Acoop.


Thanks a lot,
My intended meaning is: I can use "call" with two objects as in my examples above.
I can omit indirect objects, and a clause can still convey a meaning.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 8:28:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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Think about what this means. Is it the same thing?

Indirect object:
You gave me a letter.
You gave a letter to me.

But
You called me a liar.
Can you say
You called a liar to me
?

No.
That is wrong.
It is not the same thing. It is not an indirect object.

You called me a liar.
You called me John.

It is something different.


You are seeing something you don't understand, and you are investigating. That would be good if you had the tools to investigate with.
But you don't. Your basic English is not good enough to see that these are not the same thing. You are making mistakes, confusing yourself, and wasting your time.

Find your level, and work at that level, in an organised way.

By constantly wasting your time on complex topics you are not spending your time usefully.
You will spend ages on this, and still not be able to apply it properly.
But, if you work progressively, at the right level, then when you come to this topic it will make sense and you will learn it quickly and be able to apply it.




A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 8:38:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,691
Neurons: 9,658
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Fyfardens wrote:
In 'Are you calling me a liar?'. there is no indirect object. 'Me' is the direct object and 'a liar' the object complement.


What are you calling?
I am calling a liar. (Direct object)
To who are you calling a liar?
I am calling you.. (indirect)

I gave you a letter.
What did you give?
I gave a letter. (Direct object)
To who did you give a letter?
I gave you.. (Indirect object)




Quote:
I really don't think you want to spend time on this It will not improve your ability to communicate in English at all.

Would you be so kind as to tell me what would be worth studying to improve my communication?
Note: by asking such questions, I completely understood the use of the structure "so + adjective + as to + infinitive".

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 9:01:35 AM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,691
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
thar wrote:
Think about what this means. Is it the same thing?

Indirect object:
You gave me a letter.
You gave a letter to me.

But
You called me a liar.
Can you say
You called a liar to me
?

No.
That is wrong.
It is not the same thing. It is not an indirect object.

You called me a liar.
You called me John.

It is something different.


Thanks a lot,
I am really thinking of them as:
You called me a liar.
You called a liar to me.
You called me John.
You called John to me.

The same as
You gave me the letter.
You gave the letter to me.






Quote:
Find your level, and work at that level, in an organised way.

By constantly wasting your time on complex topics you are not spending your time usefully.
You will spend ages on this, and still not be able to apply it properly.
But, if you work progressively, at the right level, then when you come to this topic it will make sense and you will learn it quickly and be able to apply it.


You're quite right. But, what should I have done? I am all ears.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Audiendus
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 9:17:43 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 4,641
Neurons: 802,646
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
A co-operator wrote:
What are you calling?
I am calling a liar. (Direct object)
To who are you calling a liar?
I am calling you.. (indirect)

No - as thar has pointed out, this is wrong. "To who(m) are you calling a liar" does not make sense. The correct analysis is:

I am calling you. (Direct object)
What am I calling you? I am calling you what?
I am calling you a liar. (Object complement)

Similarly:

Grammarians call a comma an Oxford comma in some structures.

"A comma" is the direct, not the indirect, object. "To a comma" would not make sense.
"An Oxford comma" is the object complement.
Fyfardens
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 9:21:57 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 12/16/2017
Posts: 244
Neurons: 3,661
A cooperator wrote:

I am really thinking of them as:
You called me a liar.
You called a liar to me.
You called me John.
You called John to me.

The same as
You gave me the letter.
You gave the letter to me.


NO. The ones in red are wrong.

I can see this thread going round in circles like so many others of yours, so I'm leaving while I still have shred of sanity left..






Audiendus
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 10:17:58 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 4,641
Neurons: 802,646
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Note the difference between the following:

He called me a cab. [= he called a cab to/for me] "Me" is indirect object; "a cab" is direct object.

He called me a liar. [he did not call a liar to/for me] "Me" is direct object; "a liar" is object complement.

Where a sentence has both an object and an object complement, they refer to the same person or thing, e.g:

They elected him president.
I consider her an expert.
He made England his home.
They renamed Madras "Chennai".
The enemy left the city a complete wreck.
I will make that saying my motto.
She thought it a remarkable coincidence.
We call some of Shakespeare's plays tragedies, and others comedies.

A direct object and an indirect object do not refer to the same thing, e.g:

He gave me a book.
They lent me their machine.
She left me plenty of money.
I gave the children some toys.
You gave the car a wash.
Save us some of your cake.
They awarded the winner a magnificent prize.
Make the guests some drinks.
They showed us all the servants.
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