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60-years olds Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 4:02:17 AM
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60-years olds
60-year olds

Which of the above refers to a group who are 60 years old?

Thanks.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 4:25:43 AM

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Hello Koh Elaine.

In British English, normally the phrase for the group of people who are all sixty years old is "sixty-year-olds".
A "sixty-year-old" is ONE noun, so the words are all connected by hyphens.

He is a sixty-year-old.
They are sixty-year-olds.
There was a whole group of sixty-year-olds at the reunion party.


I am not sure whether it is exactly the same in America.
The conventions concerning hyphens are not always the same.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 6:12:17 AM

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And they are all 60 years old ;-)
(Me too, btw)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 10:23:46 AM

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Location: Annapolis, Maryland, United States
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
And they are all 60 years old ;-)
(Me too, btw)


Ah... A bunch of young whippersnappers Angel
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 11:01:56 AM
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Thanks, DragOnspeaker.
NKM
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 4:13:39 PM

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And, yes, those hyphenation conventions are the same in U.S. English.

Take it from me, a seventy-seven-year-old (for a few more weeks).

Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 6:07:14 PM
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NKM wrote:
And, yes, those hyphenation conventions are the same in U.S. English.

Take it from me, a seventy-seven-year-old (for a few more weeks).

Thanks, NKM.

What does "for a few more weeks" mean?
georgew
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 6:10:51 PM
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Whad does "for a few more weeks" mean?

Fair question, this being an English forum.
Fyfardens
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 9:50:34 PM
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Koh Elaine wrote:
What does "for a few more weeks" mean?


It probably means that NKM expects to reach his seventy-eighth birthday in a few more weeks. It could mean that do not expect to see their seventy-eighth, or any other, birthday. In a few weeks, he may be seeing angels.

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 12:43:09 AM
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Fyfardens wrote:
Koh Elaine wrote:
What does "for a few more weeks" mean?


It probably means that NKM expects to reach his seventy-eighth birthday in a few more weeks. It could mean that do not expect to see their seventy-eighth, or any other, birthday. In a few weeks, he may be seeing angels.

Oh dear! I hope and pray he doesn't mean that! Is life so short?d'oh!
almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 2:02:34 AM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan

When I'm Sixty-Four











My favorite Joan Jett






Please!
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 2:16:47 PM

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Sorry if I seemed to suggest anything unpleasant. I shall celebrate my 78th birthday on March 26, and I hope to enjoy at least a few more such occasions during the years that follow.

RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 6:35:00 PM

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Joined: 6/2/2009
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Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello Koh Elaine.

In British English, normally the phrase for the group of people who are all sixty years old is "sixty-year-olds".
A "sixty-year-old" is ONE noun, so the words are all connected by hyphens.

He is a sixty-year-old.
They are sixty-year-olds.
There was a whole group of sixty-year-olds at the reunion party.


I am not sure whether it is exactly the same in America.
The conventions concerning hyphens are not always the same.
We generally do "sixty-year olds". We don't seem to like hyphens much any more, so no way we're using more than one.

Medically, we have the same issue: is it non-small-cell carcinoma, non-small cell carcinoma, non small-cell carcinoma, or non small cell carcinoma? You find it done all ways.
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 6:42:38 PM
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NKM wrote:
Sorry if I seemed to suggest anything unpleasant. I shall celebrate my 78th birthday on March 26, and I hope to enjoy at least a few more such occasions during the years that follow.

I would like to wish you, in advance, a Happy Birthday. May there be many, many more to come!Applause
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 10:40:15 PM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Thank you!

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