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If the war continued, 'annihilation would be' OR 'it would be annihilation'.(linking verbs) Options
Audiendus
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:14:35 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 5,085
Neurons: 913,673
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
A cooperator wrote:
Thanks a lot,
"It was not meant to be" (as a complete phrase, without a complement) is a stock phrase - an idiom - meaning "it was not destined"
I fairly think I am now understanding well.
What an exciting when a learner understands an idiom in another language as what is used to be said in his/her language!
Why were you not rich until now although you had realy hardly worked and excelled yourself?
I am just guessing in what situation/occasion that idiom can be said
It was not meant to be. --- This is what God wants to be.(God's will)
not everything is meant to be but everything is worth a try.

Yes, you understand it correctly.

A cooperator wrote:
Quote:
"This opportunity is destined for all countries" does not make much sense to me. Where did you see it?

I found it at Mina7
If you see it doesn't make much sense to you, then you think that we can say one of these two ones below instead. I'd tend to say the first one.
This opportunity is meant to be for all countries.
This opportunity is supposed to be for all countries.

I would just say: "This opportunity is for all countries". "Destined" seems a strange way of saying it. ("Meant to be" and "supposed to be" wrongly suggest that there is something preventing it from applying to all countries.)
A cooperator
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:19:11 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,807
Neurons: 10,237
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Thanks a lot,
"It was not meant to be" (as a complete phrase, without a complement) is a stock phrase - an idiom - meaning "it was not destined"
I fairly think I am now understanding well.
What an exciting when a learner understands an idiom in another language as what is used to be said in his/her language!
Why were you not rich until now although you had realy hardly worked and excelled yourself?
I am just guessing in what situation/occasion that idiom can be said
It was not meant to be. --- This is what God wants to be.(God's will)
not everything is meant to be but everything is worth a try.

Yes, you understand it correctly.

A cooperator wrote:
Quote:
"This opportunity is destined for all countries" does not make much sense to me. Where did you see it?

I found it at Mina7
If you see it doesn't make much sense to you, then you think that we can say one of these two ones below instead. I'd tend to say the first one.
This opportunity is meant to be for all countries.
This opportunity is supposed to be for all countries.

I would just say: "This opportunity is for all countries". "Destined" seems a strange way of saying it. ("Meant to be" and "supposed to be" wrongly suggest that there is something preventing it from applying to all countries.)


Thanks a lot,
While you were explaining "Meant to be" and "supposed to be" that I was following you and understanding it.
I now understand it well.
I will post ("Meant to be" and "supposed to be" wrongly suggest that there is something preventing it from applying to all countries.)" the other thread of mine about if '"Meant to be" and "supposed to be" can be used interchangeably in this case you mentioned.

However, "This opportunity is destined for all countries" doesn't make much sense.
when looking up the word 'destined' in my English-Arabic Oxford dictionary, I found the "destined for(as an adjective) ... on a journey, moving towards a particular place."
I boarded a bus destined for New York.
They were destined for a new life in a new country.
However, having looked at the Arabic translation, I found a meaning written in Arabic as the meaning written in Arabic under the word 'intended'
So, I think "This opportunity is destined/intended for all countries". It still doesn't make much sense.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 6:36:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,140
Neurons: 176,780
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

If you have not done already, have a look at my answer on the other thread - I think that also answers these points.

"Destined" and "intended" do not mean the same thing. They may be interchangeable in some sentences - but not in this one.

"This course is destined for all countries" does NOT mean "This course is intended for all countries."

That site looks quite good, but it might be better to do a course which is run from Britain, Canada or USA, instead of one run from Finland.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
palapaguy
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:08:54 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 1,168
Neurons: 10,840
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
A cooperator wrote:
[quote=Audiendus][quote=A cooperator]
However, having looked at the Arabic translation, I found a meaning written in Arabic as the meaning written in Arabic under the word 'intended'
So, I think "This opportunity is destined/intended for all countries". It still doesn't make much sense.


Forum members have advised you to stop trying to learn English through Arabic translations.
Fyfardens
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:48:24 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 12/16/2017
Posts: 333
Neurons: 4,717
Forum members have advised several ways of approaching learning English. Coop chooses to ignore most of the advice.

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 2:38:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,807
Neurons: 10,237
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
NKM wrote:
Annihilation is not something which is or "is there"; it is something that happens.

"If the war continued, annihilation would result. "
"If the war continued, annihilation would be the result."
"If the war continued, annihilation would follow."
"If the war continued, annihilation would be inevitable."


But not just "annihilation would be."



NKM,
You did say that "if......., then annihilation would be." since "annihilation" is not something which "is", or "is there". However, it is something which occurs / happens.
However, You don't think of the whole clause "then annihilation would be"is the result clause originally being/happening by the action of the if-clause. Thus, "annihilation" is caused/resulted by "if the war continued"
Thus, "annihilation would be" is correct.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Fyfardens
Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 6:30:48 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 12/16/2017
Posts: 333
Neurons: 4,717
Whistle

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
Audiendus
Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 9:47:50 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 5,085
Neurons: 913,673
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
A cooperator wrote:
Thus, "annihilation" is caused/resulted by "if the war continued"

Yes.

A cooperator wrote:
Thus, "annihilation would be" is correct.

No. I don't know whether such a construction is correct in Arabic, but it is certainly not correct in English.
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, January 19, 2018 3:44:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,807
Neurons: 10,237
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Thus, "annihilation" is caused/resulted by "if the war continued"

Yes.

A cooperator wrote:
Thus, "annihilation would be" is correct.

No. I don't know whether such a construction is correct in Arabic, but it is certainly not correct in English.


Audiendus,

In Arabic, yes, in the result clause, we have only two words(the Verb + subject), which can consider a complete clause, and the verb is an intransitive verb (i.e. a complete verb). So, no need to have any complement after it.(i.e. The verb and subject in the result clause can convey a full meaning.)
However, in English, you think, "annihilation would be" is incorrect since the 'to be' must be followed by a form of subject complement or since 'annihilation' itself is not something which is or is there regardless if 'to be' is followed by a form of subject complement or not.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Fyfardens
Posted: Friday, January 19, 2018 7:50:26 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 12/16/2017
Posts: 333
Neurons: 4,717
Whistle

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
Audiendus
Posted: Friday, January 19, 2018 8:29:26 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 5,085
Neurons: 913,673
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
A cooperator wrote:
since 'annihilation' itself is not something which is or is there regardless if 'to be' is followed by a form of subject complement or not.

Yes. In English, we do not think of 'annihilation' as existing or coming into existence.

Annihilation would be.
Annihilation would be there.
Annihilation would exist.
Annihilation would occur. [correct]
Annihilation would be the result. [correct]
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