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Unofficial survey on varieties of English in TFD forums Options
nebra
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 1:13:39 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 7/21/2016
Posts: 78
Neurons: 18,915
As a relative newcomer to the forums, I’m not yet acquainted with the users who ask or answer questions. I’ve started to answer grammar questions and recently was advised by a veteran member to be mindful of the international readership and the need for “standard English.” (My English is American, and the other poster’s is British.)

I thought I’d post a survey to clarify what’s required/desired here.

--To those who ask questions: do you expect, want, or need replies relevant to a specific national variety of English, and if so, which one? Should this be stated in the request, to avoid confusion?

--To the respondents: is it expected that we qualify our answers by the variety of English that we speak? Many members identify their nationality below their username (I do it through my icon). Is that sufficient?

Below are some thoughts for those who’d like to discuss further. For those who don’t, feel free to answer the above survey questions and skip the rest.

--TFD gives two definitions of “standard English” (https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Standard+English). Neither identifies BE as “standard English” (unless we assume that no AE speakers are educated). Both definitions are from American dictionaries, however (perhaps because TFD itself is based in the US). Is there a different definition of “standard English” in the UK?

--In the US, in my experience at least, the variety of a foreign language taught in schools tends to be the one with the greatest number of speakers. Thus, while I learned the national varieties of French, Italian, and German, I learned Brazilian Portuguese and Latin American Spanish. (In a Spanish class where some students complained that they weren’t learning Castilian Spanish, the teacher replied, “125 million Mexicans can’t be wrong!” Dancing ) Pragmatically speaking, I think that approach makes sense, particularly for those preparing for international careers, where the dominant variety is likely to offer more opportunities. What do you think?

To conclude, here’s an interesting summary of the varieties of English, drawn from https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/English_language_varieties. It breaks countries down by BE vs. AE preference; I’d love to know if people from the countries named agree:

• Many areas (not all of them Commonwealth members) generally follow British rather than American usage: Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and other former British possessions in Africa, Hong Kong, Singapore, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Malaysia, and current and former British possessions in the Caribbean and Oceania.
• Canada mixes British spelling conventions ("labour", not "labor") with American ones ("realize", not "realise"). It tends to follow American vocabulary choices ("elevator", not "lift") and pronunciation. The commonest Canadian accent is very close to a Midwestern U.S. accent, though for the trained ear there are some differences.
• A few areas are heavily influenced by the U.S. and generally follow American usage, including the Philippines, Liberia, Israel, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, parts of Latin America and current and former American possessions in the Caribbean and Oceania.
• The European Union has mandated British English (not literally "British", but rather the variety of English used in Cyprus, Ireland, Malta, and the UK) as an official language of the EU, and it is generally standard British English that is taught as a foreign language in European schools, though American cultural influence is strong in Europe as well. Some American terms may be better known than their British counterparts (e.g., "truck" vs. "lorry", or "fries" vs. "chips"), and some language schools in Europe recruit American and Canadian English teachers. In general there is a trend to move from British spelling and pronunciation towards American spelling and pronunciation, especially among young people, which is fueled in no small part by the increasing availability of American media in the original version.
• English speakers without a British background and people in areas without a history of direct colonial or military influence by English-speaking nations are often more familiar with American usage because of the popularity of U.S. films, TV series, music, and spell-checkers [and the Internet, I would add]. In particular, due to the global economic and military dominance of the U.S., outside the Commonwealth and the European Union, it is usually American English that is taught as a foreign language in schools.

My replies to grammar questions are based on American English (AE), of which I'm a native speaker.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 2:53:47 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,130
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
I think it's useful to quality the type of English we speak when answering and to identify our nationality directly, an icon may be easily ignored, or not correctly identified by other users as noting were we are from.

Mine for example is of favourite holiday experience and does not represent where I live, how is another poster to know that.

Yours is of a bridge, but is it from where you live or a place you have visited? I also am not absolutely sure of which bridge it is it may be an Icon to you but at that small size it's not something I say what it is.

While I agree it's difficult to define what "Standard English" is by identiting the type of English we speak it makes it easier for learners to understand the possible differences between the versions we do speak.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
nebra
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 3:00:39 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 7/21/2016
Posts: 78
Neurons: 18,915
Thank you, Sarriesfan. I agree that it's useful to specify, but it's tedious to repeat. I think I'll take a tip from your "witty signature" line and indicate it in my signature line.

I still would love to know what those who ask questions expect or need in terms of varieties of English. I hope some of them will answer.

(p.s. My icon is the Golden Gate bridge, and I live near San Francisco. But now that I'll add a signature about AE, I think I'll change my icon!)

My replies to grammar questions are based on American English (AE), of which I'm a native speaker.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 3:07:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,130
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
rroselavy wrote:
Thank you, Sarriesfan. I agree that it's useful to specify, but it's tedious to repeat. I think I'll take a tip from your "witty signature" line and indicate it in my signature line.

I still would love to know what those who ask questions expect or need in terms of varieties of English. I hope some of them will answer.

(p.s. My icon is the Golden Gate bridge, and I live near San Francisco. But now that I'll add a signature about AE, I think I'll change my icon!)


Don't change your icon it's a nice picture, it just was not immediately obvious that it meant you live near San Francisco.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
nebra
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 3:19:49 AM

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Neurons: 18,915
No worries--I was sick of that icon. So now it's the Nebra Sky Disk, the earliest known map of the heavens, discovered in Germany in 1999. Looks like a friendly place ; )

My replies to grammar questions are based on American English (AE), of which I'm a native speaker.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 3:52:37 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 1,356
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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
rroselavy wrote:
--To those who ask questions: do you expect, want, or need replies relevant to a specific national variety of English, and if so, which one? Should this be stated in the request, to avoid confusion?

You can not demand this from those who ask questions - they come and go. But I expect the relevant information in the profile of those regulars who reply. Yes I've noticed your signature but I would prefer to see San Francisco in your profile.

rroselavy wrote:
--TFD gives two definitions of “standard English” (https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Standard+English). Neither identifies BE as “standard English” (unless we assume that no AE speakers are educated). Both definitions are from American dictionaries, however (perhaps because TFD itself is based in the US). Is there a different definition of “standard English” in the UK?

I do not know of definitions but

the only dictionaries that cater to learners are British:

https://www.ldoceonline.com/
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/

The only ESL tests that are considered internationally are Cambridge tests and IELTS. TOEFL is strictly American.

rroselavy wrote:
--In the US, in my experience at least, the variety of a foreign language taught in schools tends to be the one with the greatest number of speakers.

This is a flawed approach if applied to English. I love Canadian - just about 30 million speakers. And I already stated my opinion in this thread:

https://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst161633_-Which-variety-of-English-should-I-learn--.aspx

By the way in the USSR we were taught British English. Notwithstanding. :)



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 4:21:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,165
Neurons: 73,789
A profile may say where you are, or cane from - but that is not the whole story of how you speak.
For new members I sometimes state I speak Southern English - but as with anyone there are many influences on how I would answer a particular question. It depends on the question.

For a low level ' is this right' it would be irrelevant.

For mid-level where spelling or grammar is specifically different I would flag it.

For high level ' how likely are u to use this expression?' I would give some background - because I would probably differ from all the other 'British English ' speakers here, just as they would from each other.


Also, I think we can classify 'Indian/South Asian' English as a separate strand. It has its base in British English but has so many independent characteristics - words that would be considered 'wrong' elsewhere, or just not English words, are naturally incorporated and 'correct' in the regional version of English.


I am not here as a professional teacher on call for learners. I know your post isn't about that, so I'm not criticising it, just making a natural progression. But who I am is my business. If I were being paid to be a professional teacher giving answers to learners on a site, they would have the right to know what English I speak. As it is - I do my best to be helpful, but at the end of the day, posters on a free forum have to take pot luck with the responses they get.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 5:33:02 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Rose - good on you - this thread provides a really good opportunity for people to get some idea of the broad scope of what is meant by "English" in reference to language.

The reason I specifically ask which English a student is studying is because, as an examiner, I've seen tearful students failing - when their spoken English is really good - because they used the wrong kind of syntax, grammar or vocabulary for the exam.

The way I personally speak has nothing to do with anything either. My own way of speaking by now is a mish-mash of very different cultural influences; with quite a few "strange" words from different places because there isn't an English equivalent.

Until the '60s and 70s the main differences between BE and AE were vocabulary (the pants/trousers, rubber/eraser kinds of things) and spelling. However, as America develops in a different direction to Britain and Europe, so too does American English gradually change in accordance. Which is how all languages form: gradually. It's neither good, nor bad, but just the natural order of events. First the syntax and then different grammatical uses start to take hold until, over time, a language in its own right emerges.

Already "English" exams are divided between AE and BE. As Xap explained, except for TOEFL, the majority of International English exams use BE. THATs the reason we so often ask - a person's whole future can go down the tubes because they used BE in an AE exam, or vice versa!

"Standard English" is English that combines both forms - it uses BE grammar but a lot of American vocab. and idioms. It's the form used in international Business - but to date is not an examinable language.

I agree with Thar that I didn't join TFD to be on call for learners, either. (In fact, TFD had no learners at all in the first years it appeared.) However, although it's just a spare-time activity, I should feel absolutely gutted if anyone here failed to qualify (for Uni, for a job, for a passing grade) simply because they didn't understand how important it is for them to know the difference.


almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 6:56:51 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 1,253
Neurons: 5,715
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan









There is an old saying that America and Britain are “two nations divided by a common language.”

No one knows exactly who said this, but it reflects the way many Brits feel about American English. My British friend still tells me, “You don’t speak English. You speak American.”

But are American and British English really so different?

https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/six-difference-between-britsh-and-american-english/









there are a few notable differences between British English and American English

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/quick-grammar/british-english-and-american-english






British vs. American English: 63 Differences (Infographic)

https://www.grammarcheck.net/british-vs-american-english/



************************



By the way I am a non-native speaker of English.
My native language is Japanese.

Some times I speak like Robert De Niro and
Some times I speak like Malcolm McDowell
because I watched their movie(Taxi Driver, If..., ) so many times.

And sometimes I pretend not to be able to speak English well
because I do not want to be mistaken for a native speaker.








almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 12:02:33 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 1,253
Neurons: 5,715
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan




Oh, I forgot to say -

I liked the Golden Gate bridge icon too!




almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 8:36:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan
rroselavy wrote:
No worries--I was sick of that icon. So now it's the Nebra Sky Disk, the earliest known map of the heavens, discovered in Germany in 1999. Looks like a friendly place ; )










I checked it out.


https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/arqueologia/nebra_disk.htm









nebra
Posted: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 6:13:50 PM

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almo 1, I’m glad you shared the story of the Nebra disk (BE: disc!). The image you posted is at about 70% of the actual size. (I prefer it rotated 90 degrees clockwise, to suggest a winky face ; )) And thanks also for the BE/AE links.

To everyone else, thank you for participating in my “survey.” It’s been helpful to me, and perhaps it may be to others as well. Below I'll give a few replies.

My replies to grammar questions are based on American English (AE), of which I'm a native speaker.
nebra
Posted: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 6:24:04 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 7/21/2016
Posts: 78
Neurons: 18,915
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
You can not demand this from those who ask questions - they come and go. But I expect the relevant information in the profile of those regulars who reply. Yes I've noticed your signature but I would prefer to see San Francisco in your profile.

I hope no one felt I was “demanding” anything. In my short time here I’ve seen questions from a regular group of people, with whom others seem to be acquainted. Since I’m not, I have to wonder whether the answers I give are the ones they need; that’s all. And I agree with thar that the usefulness of one’s current location is limited and potentially misleading. I think my new signature is more to the point (thanks again to Sarriesfan for the inspiration!).


Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:

There are AE learners’ dictionaries too, such as http://learnersdictionary.com from Merriam-Webster. I especially like Collins because it is gives three sets of definitions in succession—learners, BE, and AE—followed by example sentences.


Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
The only ESL tests that are considered internationally are Cambridge tests and IELTS. TOEFL is strictly American.

Thanks, that’s good to know.


rroselavy wrote:
--In the US, in my experience at least, the variety of a foreign language taught in schools tends to be the one with the greatest number of speakers.

Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
This is a flawed approach if applied to English. I love Canadian - just about 30 million speakers. And I already stated my opinion in this thread:
https://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst161633_-Which-variety-of-English-should-I-learn--.aspx

That’s an interesting thread, though I agree with many of the respondents that no one variety is “superior” to another. As for Canadian, I’m impressed that you can tell the difference from AE; most of us can’t. For me the one giveaway is the pronunciation of “about"!

My replies to grammar questions are based on American English (AE), of which I'm a native speaker.
nebra
Posted: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 6:26:36 PM

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thar wrote:
I am not here as a professional teacher on call for learners. I know your post isn't about that, so I'm not criticising it, just making a natural progression. But who I am is my business. If I were being paid to be a professional teacher giving answers to learners on a site, they would have the right to know what English I speak. As it is - I do my best to be helpful, but at the end of the day, posters on a free forum have to take pot luck with the responses they get.

Thar, I feel much as you do but began to wonder what the expectations were. Personally, though I’m an editor and translator, I answer questions solely in my capacity as a procrastinator... because I always have this page open while working : )


My replies to grammar questions are based on American English (AE), of which I'm a native speaker.
nebra
Posted: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 6:29:50 PM

Rank: Member

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Posts: 78
Neurons: 18,915
Romany wrote:
The reason I specifically ask which English a student is studying is because, as an examiner, I've seen tearful students failing - when their spoken English is really good - because they used the wrong kind of syntax, grammar or vocabulary for the exam.
...

Already "English" exams are divided between AE and BE. As Xap explained, except for TOEFL, the majority of International English exams use BE. THATs the reason we so often ask - a person's whole future can go down the tubes because they used BE in an AE exam, or vice versa!

Romany (and Xap), thank you for clarifying about the exams; that would explain some of the mind-numbing questions I’ve seen here! Other language forums in which I occasionally participate are geared more to language lovers and the linguistically curious than to test takers, and respondents aren’t considered “teachers.” I have a feeling I should probably stick to those forums, but if I don’t, you’ll find me here as Nebra.

Happy New Year, everyone!


My replies to grammar questions are based on American English (AE), of which I'm a native speaker.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, December 30, 2017 1:36:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,630
Neurons: 181,548
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
nebra wrote:
Other language forums in which I occasionally participate are geared more to language lovers and the linguistically curious than to test takers, and respondents aren’t considered “teachers.” I have a feeling I should probably stick to those forums, but if I don’t, you’ll find me here as Nebra.

Happy New Year, everyone!

Hi nebra!
I've been having trouble answering on this site for a couple of days, so I'm 'a bit late on the chain'.

I have several things to say, really, but I'll start with this last one.
The TFD forums are not intended to be 'teaching sites' - if you look at the main index, the purpose of each is given:

Vocabulary forum
"General discussion about the English language: definitions, usage, etymology, etc."

Grammar forum
"Questions and discussions relating to English grammar and syntax"

If you look at most of the 'topics' started before 2012, you will see this - they are discussions (usually friendly, sometimes a bit heated). There was a lot of 'joking' - particularly 'plays on words' and puns.

************
My language is . . . English.
I was brought up in Northern England and have lived in many places - but I tend to have "Northern English" as my norm.
I'm not a teacher - I studied grammar as 'one of the many subjects' at school fifty years ago - but I specialised in sciences.
This doesn't matter much with grammar (English grammar is English grammar - some slight differences between countries and continents, but not huge).

However, vocabulary is totally a matter of upbringing and location.
When I first came onto this site I made the mistake of writing "no-one ever says it that way . . ." and being told "I do, and so does everyone I know".
My vocabulary is very different from Romany's and thar's and Audiendus's - they all speak generally "Southern".

It is important, I feel, to specify which "English" you speak when answering questions like "Does this sound natural?"
I have found (through seeing answers here) that people in India (for example) tend to be taught English using 'classics' - books by Rudyard Kipling, Jane Austen, Emily Brontë and so on. Therefore, their 'natural English' is very different from mine.

Also, there is a cultural difference which 'flavours' the phrases we use. Having read many discussions here, when it makes a big difference it mainly seems to be a question of "what is polite?"
In Britain, one never tells someone to do something (except military seniors, teachers or parents).
This may seem 'natural' on some parts of the planet:
"Where are the household goods, please?"
"I'll show you. Come with me, please."

In British English, they sound a bit abrupt. If the 'please' was omitted from either part, they would be unacceptable. We ask - we don't tell.
"Could you tell me where the household goods are please?"
"Certainly - if you'd like to come this way, I'll show you." OR "I'll show you. Would you come this way?"

*************
"Standard English" internationally doesn't exist - there are at least 'BE and AE' plus a few others.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, December 31, 2017 2:13:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Standard English" internationally doesn't exist - there are at least 'BE and AE' plus a few others.

I was called away in a rush last night - so ended abruptly.
As Romany says, there is a version of English which seems to be intended to include all the 'common' parts of the various dialects (yes, really, British English and American English and so on are dialects) - where there are differences, I guess that the 'majority' version is chosen.

Teaching this should be (I don't know whether it is) the "English" taught in "English as a Second Language" lessons - it would make a 'common ground' from which learners could start and see the variations.

I don't advocate the use of this 'standard' in normal life - I LIKE the many variations (though "American" is obviously all wrong . . . Whistle ).

When I look at them all, the 'variation' which seems to follow the most traditional (nineteenth century) grammar is actually the English spoken by Indian people who learn English as they grow up - however, the accent and vocabulary do not sound 'normal' to me (though I find the accent easy to understand and 'easy on the ear').

The language I call "Oxbridge" - almost "Received Pronunciation" - is spoken by VERY few people naturally. It is (as the name suggests) deliberately taught and 'received' by the few who have that particular education.

An example:
Ballet Shoes.

To me, it sounds very 'stilted' and false.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Fyfardens
Posted: Sunday, December 31, 2017 3:34:18 AM
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Romany wrote:

Already "English" exams are divided between AE and BE. As Xap explained, except for TOEFL, the majority of International English exams use BE. THATs the reason we so often ask - a person's whole future can go down the tubes because they used BE in an AE exam, or vice versa!



As a former Cambridge FCE and IELTS examiner, I can assure you that the use of American English in these examinations is not penalised. Using an inappropriate register may be penalised, but that is a different matter.

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 8:39:16 PM
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Fyfardens, as this is the way it's done throughout China, I assumed it was International - guess I shouldn't have assumed.

Certain aspects of AE (using adjectives in place of adverbs, for example) are grammatically incorrect in BE and are marked accordingly. Similarly, BE uses some tenses differently to AE and, again, would be marked incorrect in an AE exam. When I said I too was an examiner, I didn't just mean as a Lecturer. I also qualified to test both TOEFL and IELTS for students at English Language Schools because there were no native-speaking examiners in that part of the Province.

So perhaps this is just "Chinese characteristics", but I'd thought it was at least Asia-wide.
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 6:55:46 AM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan
Romany wrote:

this is the way it's done throughout China, I assumed it was International - guess I shouldn't have assumed.










Is it about 6 years ago?


Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 7:06:37 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,630
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
almo 1 wrote:. . .

More snide comments.
Why do you persist in this stupidity?


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 7:11:05 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
almo 1 wrote:. . .

More snide comments.
Why do you persist in this stupidity?


I've been wondering the very same thing.
Didn't AlmostFreeBird learn?


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 7:25:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,630
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
No.
Sidestepped the ban by registering under a new name and carried on . . .

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 9:19:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 1,253
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan












https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_AE & BE




Demographics


Linguist Braj Kachru, quoted by the Christian Science Monitor in 1996, stated that "American English is spreading faster than British English". The Monitor stated that English taught in Europe, India, and parts of Asia and Africa is more British-influenced (while English taught in Latin America, Japan, and South Korea is more American-influenced); however, informal English use outside the classroom is more influenced by the United States: Americans greatly outnumber Britons; in addition, as of 1993, the United States controlled 75 percent of the world's TV programming.[26] A BBC columnist assessed in 2015 that "American English is the current dominant force globally, like it or not".[27]


Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 10:28:21 AM

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almo 1 wrote:
The Monitor stated that English taught in Europe, India, and parts of Asia and Africa is more British-influenced

This we had in the USSR. I believe this is the case in today's Russian schools.

almo 1 wrote:
A BBC columnist assessed in 2015 that "American English is the current dominant force globally, like it or not".

There's no question of liking to me - I just do not care.

This is the south-east corner of my homepage:



Try LBC - you will love it:

http://www.lbc.co.uk/radio/



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 7:37:17 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

I would also point out that the assessment made in 2015 was by a BBC *columnist* - so its one man's opinion.

Anyone who is interested - or who *needs* the information - should go to a proper linguistic/educational/ site for the real information.
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 9:55:11 PM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan
Romany wrote:

I would also point out that the assessment made in 2015 was by a BBC *columnist* - so its one man's opinion.

Anyone who is interested - or who *needs* the information - should go to a proper linguistic/educational/ site for the real information.






Who cares about "AE or BE"?

You say tomato, I say tomato.
It is the way you speak.

You don't have to be meticulous about "AE or BE".





- I am a non-native speaker of English -

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, February 16, 2018 5:10:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,130
Neurons: 7,217
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
almo 1 wrote:
[quote=Romany]
I would also point out that the assessment made in 2015 was by a BBC *columnist* - so its one man's opinion.

Anyone who is interested - or who *needs* the information - should go to a proper linguistic/educational/ site for the real information.






Who cares about "AE or BE"?

You say tomato, I say tomato.
It is the way you speak.

You don't have to be meticulous about "AE or BE".

In spoken English it doesn't matter too much, but if you are being testing on spelling then color and colour or aluminum and aluminium etc may cause problems.




I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Friday, February 16, 2018 7:27:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,165
Neurons: 73,789
It also matters if you are seen out in public in just your vest and pants, if you are told to walk on the pavement - or if you want to buy a dresser! Whistle
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