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RESIGNIFY Options
lyafetter
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 11:34:24 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/6/2017
Posts: 1
Neurons: 8
Hi!
I was looking for the word "resignify" and The Free Dictionary couldn't find it. I've looked up on the internet and even on Google Scholar, and I've found out that this is actually a verb used even in scientific articles. I'd like some views about it. Why isn't it on The Free Dictionary? Thanks
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 12:14:50 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,355
Neurons: 40,706
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


Hey lyafetter,

On the Home Page/index page of the English section of this site, you'll find: -

Site Features and
Farlex Apps.


That's where to post messages to the TFD administrators.

All the other threads - like this one - are only read and/or answered by members.

We have no idea about how the site is organised. (In fact, we have many queries, too!Dancing )
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 5:31:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,293
Neurons: 151,357
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
lyafetter wrote:
Hi!
I was looking for the word "resignify" and The Free Dictionary couldn't find it. I've looked up on the internet and even on Google Scholar, and I've found out that this is actually a verb used even in scientific articles. I'd like some views about it. Why isn't it on The Free Dictionary? Thanks

Hi!
My views on this are - this is a normal state of affairs in most dictionaries.

There are almost as many verbs beginning "re-" as there are other verbs.

The prefix 're-' has two main meanings (see this page).

So 'resignify' would mean "to mean again" (which doesn't make much sense) - OR
"to indicate again by signs" - which is the more likely meaning.

I signified my agreement with a nod - but as no-one reacted, I resignified the agreement by saying "Yes, that's right!"

The word is not in the Oxford or Cambridge Dictionaries with any other meaning.
*********
Wikitionary says that it means "to give a new meaning to something".

The correct word for this is "redefine", not "resignify".



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 7:01:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 16,040
Neurons: 64,215
I looked for examples because the claim it was a scientific term intrigued me, as to me it is not a word and I couldn't think of a way to make it one.

The only use I saw was psychological - to assign new meaning to something. Presumably that means that 'to signify' is also psychological jargon for the 'meaning' you give to something.
Which seems a complete misuse of the verb to me, but I am not a psychologist.



Maybe I am a Philistine. Or a fossil. Maybe there is a need for a word for that particular mental process.
But to me what comes to mind with this sort of word appropriation is the need of certain professionals to sound impressively incomprehensible.
'...full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.' Whistle

Ah, I just realised the OP might be such a professional. Don't take it personally. All professionals have jargon. The trick is to use it to make a things clearer, not just because you can. That is not always the case, unfortunately. Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 7:22:30 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,293
Neurons: 151,357
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

Using the Google 'ngram viewer', it seems that the first use of the word in any published article or book was in the Schizophrenia Bulletin in 1976.

Quote:
Adaptive deployment of resources is diminished; hence, the disorders are aporetic. Such significance, once learned, may have some degree of autonomy and recur in altered circumstances. There is increasing evidence, however, that if such significations persist, it is because the symptoms become means of communication within a matrix of ongoing relationships (Haley 1971 and Watzlawick, Beavin, and Jackson 1967). In effect, the environment is arranged to resignify the meanings assigned.


This is the ngram graph - in the year 2000, the word 'signify' was used 400 times as much as 'resignify'.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
mactoria
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 12:20:42 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2014
Posts: 504
Neurons: 974,548
Location: Stockton, California, United States
Every profession, science, trade, craft, etc. has its own vocabulary in order to convey specific and/or specialized information. "Resignify" isn't a word I'm familiar with (not a licensed psychologist, but trained and worked for 30 yrs in disability/medical/human services, fields that use psychology, among other sciences), but the quotation found by DragOnspeaker makes sensible use of the word "resignify" for that field. A non-psychologist may find this language challenging to understand, but to those in that field, it conveys a lot of useful information.
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