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Should think Options
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 8:09:03 AM

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Here "should think" is used:
"Could you have the report ready by Friday?" "Yes, I should think so."

With respect to the above, can we say this sentence "I think it should stay sunny all afternoon" as below:

I should think it stay sunny all afternoon
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 1:42:22 PM
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When we say "I should think so" after saying "Yes" it means: "Yes - at the moment it looks as though I can do as you wish: but I have other things which are much more important/urgent/personal, and which could happen at any time. If any of them does happen it becomes my main priority and I will stop doing anything else"

Phew! As you can see, that's a lot of explaining to do. "I should think so." stops it all. You are willing to do it, but you can't guarantee you'll get it all done: something could happen to stop you.

(e.g. you are 8 months pregnant and could go into early labour;your mother is frail and could have an accident any day; you child's in pre-school and there's a virus going around that is making little kids sick.)
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 2:52:07 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 115
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Romany wrote:

When we say "I should think so" after saying "Yes" it means: "Yes - at the moment it looks as though I can do as you wish: but I have other things which are much more important/urgent/personal, and which could happen at any time. If any of them does happen it becomes my main priority and I will stop doing anything else"

Phew! As you can see, that's a lot of explaining to do. "I should think so." stops it all. You are willing to do it, but you can't guarantee you'll get it all done: something could happen to stop you.

(e.g. you are 8 months pregnant and could go into early labour;your mother is frail and could have an accident any day; you child's in pre-school and there's a virus going around that is making little kids sick.)


Thanks a lot.

So "I think it should stay sunny all afternoon" can't be written as "I should think it stay sunny all afternoon", right?
Audiendus
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 8:15:00 PM
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Tara2 wrote:
So "I think it should stay sunny all afternoon" can't be written as "I should think it stay sunny all afternoon", right?


No, but "I should think it will stay sunny all afternoon" would be OK. (In speech, "it will" would normally be abbreviated to "it'll".)
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 1:09:37 AM

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Audiendus wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
So "I think it should stay sunny all afternoon" can't be written as "I should think it stay sunny all afternoon", right?


No, but "I should think it will stay sunny all afternoon" would be OK. (In speech, "it will" would normally be abbreviated to "it'll".)


Why would it be OK?
Audiendus
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 9:08:16 AM
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Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Tara2 wrote:
Audiendus wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
So "I think it should stay sunny all afternoon" can't be written as "I should think it stay sunny all afternoon", right?

No, but "I should think it will stay sunny all afternoon" would be OK. (In speech, "it will" would normally be abbreviated to "it'll".)

Why would it be OK?

"I should think" indicates expectation or tentative belief. So "I should think it will stay sunny all afternoon" means "I expect it will stay sunny all afternoon" or "I think it is likely/probable that it will stay sunny all afternoon".

But you need to include the "will", because you cannot say "It stay sunny all afternoon".
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 10:56:23 AM

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Quote:

But you need to include the "will", because you cannot say "It stay sunny all afternoon".


Many thanks.
Is "It stay sunny all afternoon" wrong here?


FounDit
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 11:34:00 AM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
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Tara2 wrote:
Quote:

But you need to include the "will", because you cannot say "It stay sunny all afternoon".


Many thanks.
Is "It stay sunny all afternoon" wrong here?
Yes. The more natural sounding sentence would be, "It stayed sunny all afternoon".



A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 11:47:35 AM

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FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
[quote]
Yes. The more natural sounding sentence would be, "It stayed sunny all afternoon".



Thank you,

But it is the past tense, I want to use present tense, why is it wrong, please?
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 11:58:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 8,306
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Tara2 wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
[quote]
Yes. The more natural sounding sentence would be, "It stayed sunny all afternoon".



Thank you,

But it is the past tense, I want to use present tense, why is it wrong, please?

If you want present tense, then you would say, "It is sunny this afternoon", meaning now. Using "stayed" means the afternoon has passed, and using "will be" means future, of course.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 3:00:13 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 115
Neurons: 590
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
[quote]
Yes. The more natural sounding sentence would be, "It stayed sunny all afternoon".



Thank you,

But it is the past tense, I want to use present tense, why is it wrong, please?

If you want present tense, then you would say, "It is sunny this afternoon", meaning now. Using "stayed" means the afternoon has passed, and using "will be" means future, of course.

Can we use the present time for future?
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