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looking for an idiom or a word Options
robjen
Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 2:28:22 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/17/2015
Posts: 522
Neurons: 2,893
I am looking for an idiom or a word that is the opposite of the idiom "to get straight to the point". I am going to make up a scenario.

(ex) Suppose that your friend wants to borrow money from you. But he feels too embarrassed to ask you for money directly He doesn't get

straight to
the point. He tells you lots of things before he asks for money. He says something like three years ago, he lost lots of money in his

stock investments. Half a year after the financial loss, he had a serious injury which stopped him from working for a few months. Next, he lost

his job because his boss moved his business overseas. After that, he used his savings for gambling until last month, and so on.




I am looking for an idiom or a word which means that he doesn't get straight to the point. He tells a long story before he asks for money. Please

help me. Thanks a lot for your help.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 2:37:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 17,122
Neurons: 69,146
Two very common idioms to check out:

go around the houses

beat about the bush

Quote:
If someone is not clear in what they are saying and says things in an indirect manner making it difficult to understand what they mean they are 'beating about the bush'. People tend to 'beat about the bush' when trying to avoid talking about an embarrassing or difficult topic.

It is from hunting - driving out ground birds taking cover in bushes. You don't hit the bush - you work indirectly - you have a stick and beat the area around the bush, and that scares the birds out.

Quote:
go round the houses or go all round the houses BRITISH
If someone goes round the houses or goes all round the houses, they keep talking about unimportant things before they get to the thing they are meant to be talking about.
eg
After three minutes of going round the houses I had still failed to get a sense from him of whether he felt he'd done anything wrong.
I really can't be bothered going all round the houses with you. This is the deal.

The origin of that one is fairly obvious. Just not going straight to your destination.

common phrases:
stalling, avoiding the issue, not getting to the point, working up the courage to say something



mactoria
Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 3:08:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2014
Posts: 567
Neurons: 1,208,463
Location: Stockton, California, United States
Robjen: Thar's suggestion of "beat around the bush" is a very common one in the US and I think fits what you're looking for. The other ones he suggests are good too, except "go around the houses" which is as he points out, a British idiom and isn't one used in the US as far as I know.

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