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occupancy Options
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 11:41:31 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 1,263
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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Longman says it is uncountable:

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/occupancy

Quote:
occupancy /ˈɒkjəpənsi $ ˈɑːk-/ AWL noun [uncountable] formal
1 the number of people who stay, work, or live in a room or building at the same time

Yet in this article it has occupancy as a countable noun:

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/holdover

Quote:
Richard lived in a single-room occupancy, a holdover from the twenties, when Greenwich Village was filled with writers and artists.

Which is correct?


აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 12:26:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 16,317
Neurons: 65,303
The second one is a special case of an adjectival phrase becoming used as a noun.

Occupancy is an attributive noun in the phrase 'single resident occupancy' housing, or single room occupancy housing, or buildings.
Ie housing consisting of one room. Communal bathrooms. Cheap housing for homeless, low income, temporary accomodation. etc. Only in American and Canadian cities. And a long time ago. ago. Anything still around more recently was, as your quote says, a holdover from earlier times.

But like many technical terms, you don't need the noun. The label conveys the meaning, so drop the noun and just use the label, colloquopially. So the phrase becomes SRO or single resident occupancy. And that becomes used as a noun. Countable, if you are using it that way. But only in that fixed phrase - SRO. It is not a countable noun on its own.


In this article they are called single-room-occupancy hotels and residences.

New York Times article:
Quote:
The Many Lives of a New York S.R.O.
By JOSEPH BERGERJUNE 4, 2016

Capitol Hall, a single-room-occupancy residence for decades on West 87th Street, has undergone a top-to-bottom renovation.
In the early 1980s, while most Upper West Siders were breathing a sigh of relief that the neighborhood’s seedy, sometimes menacing single-room-occupancy hotels were being converted into co-ops, a few residents of West 87th Street worried about the fate of the hotels’ tenants, particularly those in the S.R.O. on their block, the Capitol Hall.

Thirty-three years ago, in a bold, practically unheard-of stroke, they actually bought the 10-story hotel, enlisting Goddard Riverside Community Center and other nonprofit organizations as well as government agencies to help finance the purchase. The price: $1.95 million, what a two-bedroom co-op might sell for today. They saw to it that social workers were installed and security was in place at the hotel entrance, and they took turns getting to know the tenants and running activities like Bingo. While there have been occasional disturbances to ruffle the leafy, largely brownstone block’s calm demeanor, the hotel has provided permanent homes for hundreds of the poor, frail, elderly, troubled or addicted.

Last month, the hotel’s neighbors and its many donors celebrated the completion of a $16.7 million, top-to-bottom renovation of the building that has finally provided the 200 current tenants their own bathrooms and kitchenettes, and created community rooms to flavor their days with Netflix movies, gab sessions, gardening and more. The renovation, capitalizing on newly available government preservation funds, has reduced the residents’ indignities.

“Before, I had to get fully dressed just to use the bathroom on the floor,” said Charlene Saliski, a 60-year-old former home health aide who has lived in the building for six years with her longhaired Chihuahua, Princess Sofia, and her tabby, Prince George. “I’m proud of the building, proud of where I live now.

Charlene Saliski, a resident of Capitol Hall for six years, and others in the building’s garden club helped plant flowers.

Ms. Saliski found herself at the Capitol Hall after the death of her partner from lung cancer; the loss of his income meant she could no longer afford the $1,000 rent on her apartment in East New York, Brooklyn. Another Capitol Hall tenant, Eddie A. Ortiz, 49, a freelance hairdresser, has depression and supports himself with a city stipend for H.I.V.-positive individuals. He settled in a year and a half ago after periods of boarding with his mother, who has cancer, and at a Manhattan homeless shelter. He has outfitted his room with furniture discarded on sidewalks but with a few touches of the interior decorator he once was — a zebra rug and posters of Isadora Duncan and the Rat Pack.

It may be a conceit, but I like to think of such tenants as refugees of a sort, finding havens from life’s vagaries and mishaps. The hotel once housed literal refugees, including my family.

I was 5 years old in 1950 when after a voyage on a Merchant Marine ship across the Atlantic, my parents, Marcus and Rachel Berger, survivors of the Holocaust whose Polish hometowns had been destroyed; my 3-year-old brother, Josh; and I moved into a single room in the Capitol Hall, subsidized by the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society.

We lived there for several weeks, and my memories of that time are spare — a dark, dusty, oppressive room, walks along Broadway where we encountered other war refugees living in S.R.O. hotels, and a fistfight between my father and a man who came to kick us out of the hotel after the immigrant aid payments ended. But the Capitol Hall gave us a foothold in the country and introduced us to the cosmopolitan pleasures of the West Side, a neighborhood we were to live in for most of the next five years.




Dictionaries should be more careful in selecting their quotes!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 1:04:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 1,263
Neurons: 430,387
Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
thar wrote:
Occupancy is an attributive noun in the phrase 'single resident occupancy' housing, or single room occupancy housing, or buildings.

But like many technical terms, you don't need the noun. The label conveys the meaning, so drop the noun and just use the label, colloquopially. So the phrase becomes SRO or single resident occupancy. And that becomes used as a noun. Countable, if you are using it that way. But only in that fixed phrase - SRO. It is not a countable noun on its own.

Thank you.


აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 5:56:30 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,552
Neurons: 41,416
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Thanks to you both.

This was an eye-opener: had never heard of "an occupancy", or an SRO, let alone an SRO Hotel. Had I ever come across any of those terms or usages, I would have been completely flummoxed!

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